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An Assessment Of The Performance Of Engineering Technology Graduates

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Conference

1998 Annual Conference

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 28, 1998

Start Date

June 28, 1998

End Date

July 1, 1998

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

3.76.1 - 3.76.13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/6933

Download Count

82

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Paper Authors

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Charlie P. Edmonson

author page

Joseph A. Untener

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2647

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE PERFORMANCE OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY GRADUATES CHARLIE P. EDMONSON, JOSEPH A. UNTENER The University of Dayton

ABSTRACT

Graduates of Engineering Technology Programs continue to perform at high levels of employer satisfaction in very diverse positions. This paper describes a study performed by The University of Dayton Engineering Technology Department of graduates between the years of 1992 - 1996. This study addresses salary levels, satisfaction of graduates with the Engineering Technology Program, academic preparation, and career mobility opportunities. The study includes feedback from the employers of the graduates relative to their satisfaction with academic preparation and performance of the graduates. A comparison is made of this information with similar work done in 1991 that covered a twenty-five year period of bachelor degree graduates. 1 This paper also provides the procedures and approaches used in completing this assessment, and other instruments that are used for similar purposes.

INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND

The University of Dayton offers four programs in Engineering Technology, all of which are accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. 2 In preparation for a Fall 1997 visit, the Department of Engineering Technology conducted a survey instrument to meet the requirements for re-accreditation. The survey was sent to all graduates since the 1991 accreditation visit and to their employers. The rate of returns was more than adequate enough to provide clear information on the performance of our graduates, their satisfaction levels, and the views of their employers. The information is also consistent with the other vehicles used in our total plan for assessment. The other instruments used in the assessment plan include a “Cap and Gown” survey, named because it is a very brief questionnaire administered to students that are literally lined up for the graduation ceremony, and longer term alumni surveys that reach further back for data from graduates.

While each of the survey instruments has a different focus and goals, the general picture that is generated from the surveys allows us to assess the job placement, earnings capability, and career mobility of the graduates. They also allow us to determine the graduates’ satisfaction with the program, their academic preparation, and their thoughts on curriculum development. The surveys completed by the employers of our graduates allow us to measure their views on the program at the university and the type of graduates that we produce.

RELATED STUDIES

A number of recent studies indicate that University of Dayton Engineering Technology graduates are faring well. Robert L. Mott performed a study of Engineering Technology graduates at the University of Dayton between 1966 and December 1991. 1 Mott concluded that graduates are

Edmonson, C. P., & Untener, J. A. (1998, June), An Assessment Of The Performance Of Engineering Technology Graduates Paper presented at 1998 Annual Conference, Seattle, Washington. https://peer.asee.org/6933

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 1998 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015