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An Educational Framework to Promote Self-Authorship in Engineering Undergraduates

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

Liberal Education Division Technical Session Session 12

Tagged Division

Liberal Education/Engineering & Society

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

21

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32058

Download Count

5

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Paper Authors

biography

Laura Kasson Fiss Michigan Technological University

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Laura Kasson Fiss is a Research Assistant Professor in the Pavlis Honors College at Michigan Technological University. She holds a PhD from Indiana University in English (2013). Her work has appeared in Victorian Periodicals Review, The Lion and the Unicorn, and The Cambridge Companion to Gilbert and Sullivan. In addition to her research on Victorian humor, she conducts higher education research and scholarship on issues of inclusion, reflection, and innovation.

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biography

Lorelle A. Meadows Michigan Technological University

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Dr. Lorelle Meadows joined Michigan Technological University in 2014 where she is leading the creation of a new honors college uniquely committed to inclusion and equity, and eliminating barriers to high impact educational practices.  Prior to joining Michigan Tech, Dr. Meadows was Assistant Dean of Academic Programs in the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan. Her primary responsibility in that role was to assure the delivery of a curriculum that addressed college-wide educational objectives in order to prepare students for the careers of the 21st century. This engagement led to her development as an educational researcher and she now conducts interdisciplinary research at the intersection of social psychology, higher education and engineering education, with specific emphasis on the influence of gender stereotypes in student teams, motivation and the development of self-authorship in STEM undergraduates.

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Mary Raber Michigan Technological University

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Mary Raber currently serves as Assistant Dean for the Pavlis Honors College Institute, co-Director of the Innovation Center for Entrepreneurship and Director of the Global Leadership Program at Michigan Technological University. She oversaw the implementation and growth of the Enterprise Program at Michigan Tech since its inception in 2000. Her current responsibilities include academic program and curriculum development and assessment of and workshop/course instruction in the areas of teaming, human-centered design and leadership. She received her BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Michigan and an MBA from Wayne State University and is currently working on her PhD at Michigan Technological University. Before joining MTU she held various engineering and management positions during a 15 year career in the automotive industry.

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biography

Kari B. Henquinet Michigan Technological University

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Kari Henquinet is the Director of the Peace Corps Master's International and Peace Corps Prep Programs and a Senior Lecturer in Anthropology at Michigan Technological University. Her research focuses on international development, gender, and human rights in Niger (West Africa) and American global humanitarian and service engagement of students and nonprofits. She has published her work in a variety of collaborative book projects and peer-reviewed journals: http://www.mtu.edu/social-sciences/department/faculty/henquinet/.

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biography

Richard Jason Berkey Michigan Technological University

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Rick Berkey is a Professor of Practice in the Pavlis Honors College (PHC) at Michigan Technological University. His teaching responsibilities and research interests include continuous improvement (Lean and Six Sigma), quality engineering, and design methodologies. Since 2015, Rick has served as Director of The Enterprise Program, a multi-year, multidisciplinary program available to all majors; the program’s scope includes a portfolio of 25 teams, 900 students from 35 majors, 38 faculty involved in advising and instruction, and an annual operating budget of over $1 million. From 2006-2015, Rick worked as the Sponsored Projects Manager for Michigan Tech’s Enterprise and Senior Design Programs, where he was successful in securing more than $6 million in externally-sponsored projects for these programs. Since 2008, Rick has also served as the faculty advisor to Michigan Tech’s Supermileage Systems Enterprise, a multidisciplinary team who develops energy-efficient vehicles for the SAE Supermileage and Shell Eco-marathon vehicle design competitions.

Prior to Michigan Tech, Rick spent 12 years in multiple roles in industry spanning the automotive, commercial vehicle, and consumer products sectors. His experience includes roles in engineering, program management, supply chain, operations, and continuous improvement. Rick holds a Six Sigma Black Belt certification with a concentration in Design for Six Sigma methods from Honeywell International. During his time at Honeywell, Rick authored/co-authored 10 patents in the area of automotive filtration. His educational background includes a BSME from the University of Toledo, an MBA from Bowling Green State University, and a MSME from Michigan Technological University.

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Abstract

The Greek philosopher Heraclitus recognized that change is the only constant, asserting that change is central to the universe. We now live in a time where change is not only constant, but rapid and often disruptive, bringing with it a high level of uncertainty for the future. To prepare students for this future of rapid change, it’s important to consider the development of our students as highly skillful and knowledgeable in their chosen field AND as individuals with the competencies needed to manage uncertainty and change and to enter the post-graduate world as participants and contributors. This requires that our students build their own self-concept, learn to develop meaningful and rewarding relationships, and mature their capacity for deep learning.

In the Pavlis Honors College at Michigan Technological University, we have developed an educational framework based in psychologist Robert Kegan’s theory of adult development [1] to provide students with a foundation in the competencies needed to advance their ability to become flexible professionals, and also balance their knowledge across the technical and social worlds. Kegan’s theory suggests that as individuals mature, they encounter disorienting dilemmas that cause them to question their world view. With sufficient support through these challenges, individuals develop their own sense of self rather than depending on external authorities to define who they are. They begin to shift their perspective from simply reacting to the world around them, to examining themselves as objects operating within the world with autonomy and self-determination. Kegan categorizes this development shift from adolescence to adult as a shift from the socialized mind to the self-authoring mind. It is exactly this internal definition or self-authorship that provides individuals with the capacity to manage complexity, uncertainty and change—the world our students are entering. Typically, this shift to becoming self-authored occurs after graduation [2], however, given an appropriately designed learning environment [3], students can advance their capacity for self-authorship in their undergraduate years.

In this paper, we share an educational framework built on the theories of adult development self-authorship and self-determination, as well as our curriculum which is designed to build capacity for self-authorship in our students. We will outline the innovations that this has introduced to our program including creating an honors program that does not use GPA or standardized test scores for admission or retention. We will share our rubric for assessment of self-authorship using reflection assignments and offer case studies of engineering students who reveal increasing levels of self-authorship capacity and preparation as flexible professionals, ready to enter the rapidly changing world and engineering work force.

[1] Kegan, R. (1994). In over our heads: The mental demands of modern life. Harvard University Press. [2] Magolda, M. B. B. (2008). Three elements of self-authorship. Journal of College Student Development, 49(4), 269-284. [3] Magolda, M. B. B., & King, P. M. (2004). Learning partnerships: Theory and models of practice to educate for self-authorship. Stylus Publishing, LLC.

Fiss, L. K., & Meadows, L. A., & Raber, M., & Henquinet, K. B., & Berkey, R. J. (2019, June), An Educational Framework to Promote Self-Authorship in Engineering Undergraduates Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/32058

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2019 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015