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An Examination of Professor-Student Interactions, Stem Learning Challenges, and Student Adaptation Decisions During Covid-19 Pandemic

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Student Division Technical Session 1

Tagged Division

Student

Page Count

17

DOI

10.18260/1-2--36668

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/36668

Download Count

193

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Paper Authors

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Mercy Folashade Fash North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

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Mercy Fash is an enthusiastic and determined researcher. She is currently a graduate student at North Carolina A&T State University with the Applied Science and Technology Program.
With a Bachelor's degree in Computer Engineering, a master's in Technology management and currently attaining a PhD in Applied Science and Technology, Mercy is a passionate STEM student who is purposeful about the success and well-being of other STEM students. She is currently working on other researches that would help understand the decision-making, and thinking processes of STEM students.
Mercy has had the opportunity to work with great minded STEM scholars and researchers in the course of her career and has been exposed to real life experiences that have shaped her perspective on the relevance of STEM professions. Mercy is currently mentored by Dr. Andre Ofori-Boadu who has tremendous achievements in the STEM profession as a resourceful scholar and a researcher. Mercy has a learnt a lot from Dr. Andrea in the little time she has worked with her and still hopes to learn some more. Mercy is determined to find out possible ways to advance the STEM professions and also inspire young students to also see the relevance of the STEM professions.
Overall, Mercy has a bright future in the research and as a STEM professional.

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Andrea Nana Ofori-Boadu North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-6401-1399

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Dr. Andrea N. Ofori-Boadu is an Assistant Professor of Construction and Construction Management with the Department of Built Environment within the College of Science and Technology at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (NCA & T). Her research interests are in bio-derived cement replacement materials, delivery of sustainable built environments, and professional identity development in STEM students, particularly architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) women.

In February 2019, Andrea received the prestigious National Science Foundation NSF - CAREER award to research professional identity development processes in undergraduate AEC women. She has also received grants from East Coast Construction Services, Engineering Information Foundation, and the National Association of Home Builders.

In 2019, Andrea received the Outstanding Young Investigator award for both North Carolina A & T State University and the College of Science and Technology. In 2018, she was selected as a 2018 National Science Foundation - NC A & T ADVANCE IT Faculty Scholar. She also received the 2018 CoST Teaching Excellence Merit Award. Dr. Ofori-Boadu received both the 2017 NC A & T - CoST Rookie Research Excellence Award and the 2017 North Carolina A & T State University (NCAT) Rookie Research Excellence Award. Under her mentorship, Dr. Ofori-Boadu’s students have presented research posters at various NCAT Undergraduate Research Symposia resulting in her receiving a 2017 Certificate of Recognition for Undergraduate Research Mentoring. In 2016, her publication was recognized by the Built Environment Project and Asset Management Journal as the 2016 Highly Commended Paper. Andrea has served as a reviewer for the National Science Foundation (NSF), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and several journals and conferences.

Dr. Ofori-Boadu engages in professional communities to include the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB), and the National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC).

In 2015, Dr. Ofori-Boadu established her STEAM ACTIVATED! program for middle-school girls. She also serves as the Executive Vice-President of Penuel Consult, Incorporated. She is married to Victor Ofori-Boadu and they are blessed with three wonderful children.

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Rabiatu Bonku North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

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Wanya Alford North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

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Alesia Coralie Ferguson North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

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Dr. Alesia Ferguson, is an Environmental Engineer and Public Health Specialist. She currently is the Chair of the Built Environment Department and oversees three programs: Geomatics, Environmental Health and Safety and Construction Management. Her research work focuses on children's environmental exposures and quantifying their related activities patterns. She was also a EPA lead trainer for the RRP regulations and a healthy homes specialists. She teaches courses such as Hazards Control, Industrial Hygiene, Fire Prevention, Exposure Analysis and more.

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Angela M. White North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

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Dr. Angela Michelle White has an extreme passion for teaching and learning science. She earned a Bachelor of Science in Biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a Master of Science in Biology from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, and a Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in Educational Psychology from North Carolina State University. Dr. White has served as an educator for 15 years at various levels and currently serves as the Assistant Dean of Student Success for the College of Science and Technology at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. In this role she strategically develops and implements initiatives that promote the academic achievement and success of students within the College. Her current research interests, publications, and presentations give attention to racial identity, science identity, science self-efficacy, metacognition, and STEM achievement of African American students. As a strong advocate for the participation of African American females in STEM, Dr. White continuously engages in discourse and research that will promote greater access to STEM-related opportunities and recognition of African American females.

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Abstract

EXAMINATION OF PROFESSOR-STUDENT INTERACTIONS AND UNDERGRADUATE STEM STUDENT LEARNING EXPERIENCES DURING COVID-19 PANDEMIC ABSTRACT Professor-student interactions influence student learning experiences and performance. The COVID pandemic transformed STEM learning environments across U.S. institutions; however, its impact on STEM professor-student interactions and STEM student learning experiences are yet to be understood. The purpose of this nationwide inductive research study is to examine the impact of COVID-19 on professor-student interactions, undergraduate STEM student learning, and STEM student performance. To achieve this, a qualitative method is adopted and purposive sampling is utilized to enroll 63 STEM students from six U.S institutions. Data is collected through one-hour ZOOM interviews, giving students the opportunity to narrate their STEM learning experiences and performance during the COVID-19 pandemic. The data is analyzed using the NVIVO qualitative analysis software for coding, categorizing, memo-ing, and constant comparative analysis. Results reveal emergent codes on the STEM professor-student interactions to include professor leniency, caring attitude, availability, communication, instruction style, teaching resources, technology literacy, camera on/off requirements, live/recorded sessions, time zone, and student workload. Limited positive impacts on student learning include improved familiarity with alternate STEM learning resources and development of virtual learning soft skills. Negative learning experiences are extensive and coded as: poor comprehension, keeping up, overdrive, isolation, lowered motivation, schedule conflicts, and anxiety. Consequently, students made adaptation decisions coded as: alternate learning sources, refined scheduling, community support, preferring teaching assistants, working out, reporting professors, procrastination, and tuning out. While proactive students and students with prior virtual learning experiences improved or maintained their grades, many students opted for the pass/fail grade or complete withdrawal due to poor STEM learning and performance. Findings indicate that while STEM professors were adjusting to modified teaching environments, many STEM students were developing a sense of independence, self-study, and peer reliance to improve their own STEM understanding and performance with minimal reliance on STEM professors. Lessons learned and best practices for professor-student interactions and student learning are recommended for potential replication in STEM communities for improved adaptability and resiliency during future pandemics. Future research will focus on measuring the effect of best practices on professor-student interactions, student learning experiences, and performance.

Fash, M. F., & Ofori-Boadu, A. N., & Bonku, R., & Alford, W., & Ferguson, A. C., & White, A. M. (2021, July), An Examination of Professor-Student Interactions, Stem Learning Challenges, and Student Adaptation Decisions During Covid-19 Pandemic Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. 10.18260/1-2--36668

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