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An Examination of the Relationship Between Intellectual Development and Learning Preferences in Electrical and Computer Engineering (Ongoing)

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Conference

2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Atlanta, Georgia

Publication Date

June 23, 2013

Start Date

June 23, 2013

End Date

June 26, 2013

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

New Trends in ECE Education II

Tagged Division

Electrical and Computer

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

23.165.1 - 23.165.14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/19179

Download Count

20

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Paper Authors

biography

Askia Hill Purdue University

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I am a Ph.D student in Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University. I am a member of NSBE as well as ASEE. My researching interests include improving data locality in compilers and intellectual development of engineering student.

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biography

Cordelia M Brown Purdue University, West Lafayette

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Cordelia M. Brown is an Assistant Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Engineering Education at Purdue University. She received her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering at Vanderbilt University, her M.S. in Electrical Engineering at Vanderbilt University, and her B.S. in Electrical Engineering
at Tuskegee University. Her research interests include assessment of instructional methods, laboratory design, collaborative learning, and retention and recruitment issues in engineering education.

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Abstract

An
Examination
of
the
Relationship
Between
Intellectual
Development
and
Learning
 Preferences
in
Electrical
and
Computer
Engineering 

 A
major
challenge
facing
the
engineering
community
is
the
gap
between
the
intellectual
development
of
students
and
where
employers
need
it
to
be.

Researchers
of
engineering
education
have
explored
multiple
ways
to
close
this
gap.

One
frequently
used
method
is
identifying
and
evaluating
student’s
learning
preferences.


Though
this
method
has
brought
insight
into
this
problem,
there
has
been
little
work
done
to
answer
the
following:
To
what
extent,
do
students
with
particular
learning
preferences
undergo
a
higher
degree
of
intellectual
development
through
an
engineering
curriculum?

 This
paper
discusses
a
study
that
examines
the
intellectual
development
levels
of
electrical
and
computer
engineering
students
and
seeks
to
determine
if
there
is
any
correlation
between
a
student’s
progress
through
the
levels
of
William
Perry’s
model
of
intellectual
development
levels
with
a
student’s
learning
preference
defined
by
Felder
and
Silverman.


The
study
seeks
to
capture
a
profile
of
students
in
electrical
and
computer
engineering
(ECE)
at
a
large
Midwestern
university
at
various
classification
levels
of
their
college
career
during
the
academic
year.

A
profile
consists
of
a
student’s
background
information,
their
learning
preference,
and
their
current
level
of
intellectual
development.

Profiles
are
taken
of
sophomore,
junior,
and
senior
students
at
various
points
during
the
school
year.
Intellectual
development
is
determined
using
Dr.
William
Moore’s
Learning
Environment
Preferences
(LEP)
instrument.

Learning
preferences
are
determined
by
administering
Felder
and
Silverman’s
Inventory
of
Learning
Styles
(ILS).

Along
with
the
LEP
and
ILS
results,
background
information
on
courses
taken,
current
year
in
the
ECE
program,
internships/co‐op
experience,
and
GPA
is
recorded
to
complete
a
profile.

 Our
initial
evaluation
of
students’
responses
suggests
that
sensing/intuitive
and
sequential/global
learning
preference
dichotomies
do
have
some
impact
on
a
student’s
intellectual
development.

We
are
still
gathering
more
data
points
to
confirm
this
assertion.


Hill, A., & Brown, C. M. (2013, June), An Examination of the Relationship Between Intellectual Development and Learning Preferences in Electrical and Computer Engineering (Ongoing) Paper presented at 2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Atlanta, Georgia. https://peer.asee.org/19179

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