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An Improved Cellphone-based Wearable Electrocardiograph Project for a Biomedical Instrumentation Course Sequence

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

BME Laboratories and Projects

Tagged Division

Biomedical Engineering

Page Count

14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32064

Download Count

29

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Paper Authors

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Charles Carlson Kansas State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/https://0000-0002-4293-3090

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Charles Carlson received a B.S. degree in Physics from Fort Hays State University in 2013 as well as B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Kansas State University in 2013, 2015, and 2019, respectively. Charles is currently a Graduate Teaching and Research Assistant in Electrical and Computer Engineering at Kansas State University (KSU). He works in the KSU Medical Component Design Laboratory and is interested in engineering education, bioinstrumentation, and bioinformatics. He is a member of the American Society for Engineering Education and the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society.

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biography

Dong Xu Ren Kansas State Univerisity

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Dong Ren received a B.Eng. majoring in Electronics & Telecommunication Systems from The Australian National University (ANU) in 2011. Dong is currently pursuing his M.Sc. in Electrical Engineering at Kansas State University (KSU). He works in the KSU Medical Component Design Laboratory and his interests include Bioinstrumentation and Wearable Devices. He is a member of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS).

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biography

Steve Warren Kansas State University

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Steve Warren received a B.S. and M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Kansas State University (KSU) in 1989 and 1991, respectively, followed by a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from The University of Texas at Austin in 1994. Dr. Warren is a Professor in the KSU Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, and he serves as the Program Coordinator for the KSU Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering Degree Program. Prior to joining KSU in August 1999, Dr. Warren was a Principal Member of the Technical Staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. He directs the KSU Medical Component Design Laboratory, a facility partially funded by the National Science Foundation that provides resources for the research and development of distributed medical monitoring technologies and learning tools that support biomedical contexts. His research focuses on (1) plug-and-play, point-of-care medical monitoring systems that utilize interoperability standards, (2) wearable sensors and signal processing techniques for the determination of human and animal physiological status, and (3) educational tools and techniques that maximize learning and student interest. Dr. Warren is a member of the American Society for Engineering Education and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

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Abstract

Medical devices that communicate with cell phones are considered essential elements of a healthcare-delivery enterprise focused on personalized medicine. The technical development tools that promote the creation and use of such systems are similar in nature to emerging makerspace tools. These toolsets allow hobbyists and other individuals with limited formal training to piece together technical gadgets with hardware components that offer simple, standardized interfaces with easy to use software libraries. In an earlier publication, the authors presented a wearable electrocardiograph (ECG) project for a Fall 2017 senior-level undergraduate biomedical instrumentation course sequence – a project that integrated makerspace ideas with circuit-level design concepts traditionally utilized in such upper-level instrumentation courses. For that project, each student was tasked with designing a wearable electrocardiograph that communicated with a cell phone via a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) link. They were responsible for the analog/digital circuitry, the board layout, the 3D-printed case, and the cell phone app that received those BLE transmissions. This paper describes a revised Fall 2018 offering of that project, where various project elements have been improved to promote student learning and to realize a larger percentage of working designs. Updated elements include a more flexible instrumentation amplifier, simplified printed circuit board (PCB) design guidelines, a new wireless module, and an altered design/test schedule. As before, student performance was assessed in light of specific learning objectives, and differential values from new pre/post-project surveys were compared to commensurate values from the previous project offering to quantify changes in students’ self-perceptions of learning driven by changes in the project-delivery process. These comparisons indicate that project updates maintained student learning while increasing the likelihood that a given student could implement a suitable level of wearable electrocardiograph functionality.

Carlson, C., & Ren, D. X., & Warren, S. (2019, June), An Improved Cellphone-based Wearable Electrocardiograph Project for a Biomedical Instrumentation Course Sequence Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/32064

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