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An Inductive Qualitative Analysis of Student Interviews on Engineering Global Preparedness

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Beyond the Classroom

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

24

Page Numbers

26.186.1 - 26.186.24

DOI

10.18260/p.23525

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/23525

Download Count

82

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Paper Authors

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Scott Charles Streiner University of Pittsburgh

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Scott C. Streiner is a full-time doctoral student in the Industrial Engineering Department at the University of Pittsburgh. He conducts research in the field of globalized engineering, including studying offerings in international engineering education, and the extent to which these experiences improve global preparedness of engineering students. Currently, Streiner’s research focus is on how best to operationalize and evaluate global programming strategies within the engineering curriculum.

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Erin McCave Clemson University

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Svetlana V. Levonisova University of Southern California

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Svetlana Levonisova is a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Southern California. Her research interests include college access and STEM education, internationalization of engineering education, research methods, and institutional effectiveness. She received her Ed.D. in Educational Leadership from the University of Southern California.

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Rachel Elizabeth Savage

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Mary E. Besterfield-Sacre University of Pittsburgh

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Dr. Mary Besterfield-Sacre is an Associate Professor and Fulton C. Noss Faculty Fellow in Industrial Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. She is the Director for the Engineering Education Research Center (EERC) in the Swanson School of Engineering, and serves as a Center Associate for the Learning Research and Development Center. Her principal research is in engineering education assessment, which has been funded by the NSF, Department of Ed, Sloan, EIF, and NCIIA. Dr. Sacre’s current research focuses on three distinct but highly correlated areas – innovative design and entrepreneurship, engineering modeling, and global competency in engineering. She is currently associate editor for the AEE Journal.

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Gisele Ragusa University of Southern California

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Gisele Ragusa is a Professor of Engineering Education at the University of Southern California. She conducts research on college transitions and retention of underrepresented students in engineering and also research about engineering global preparedness and engineering innovation. She also has research expertise in STEM K-12 and in STEM assessment. She chairs USC's STEM Consortium.

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Lisa Benson Clemson University

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Lisa Benson is an Associate Professor of Engineering and Science Education at Clemson University, with a joint appointment in Bioengineering. Her research focuses on the interactions between student motivation and their learning experiences. Her projects involve the study of student perceptions, beliefs and attitudes towards becoming engineers and scientists, and their problem solving processes. Other projects in the Benson group include effects of student-centered active learning, self-regulated learning, and incorporating engineering into secondary science and mathematics classrooms. Her education includes a B.S. in Bioengineering from the University of Vermont, and M.S. and Ph.D. in Bioengineering from Clemson University.

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Cheryl Matherly The University of Tulsa

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Dr. Cheryl Matherly is Vice Provost for Global Education at The University of Tulsa, where she has responsibility for the strategic leadership of the university’s plan for comprehensive internationalization. Dr. Matherly’ co-directs the NanoJapan program, funded by the National Science Foundation in order to expand international research opportunities for students in STEM fields. She is the recipient of two Fulbright grants for international education administrators (Germany and Japan.) She has an Ed.D. in Education Leadership and Culture Studies from the University of Houston.

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Larry J. Shuman University of Pittsburgh

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Larry J. Shuman is Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Distinguished Service Professor of industrial engineering at the Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh. His research focuses on improving the
engineering education experience with an emphasis on assessment of design and problem solving, and the study of the ethical behavior of engineers and engineering managers. A former Senior Editor of the Journal of Engineering Education, Shuman is the Founding Editor of Advances in Engineering Education. He has published widely in engineering education literature, and is co-author of Engineering Ethics: Balancing Cost, Schedule and Risk - Lessons Learned from the Space Shuttle (Cambridge University Press). He received his Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University in Operations Research and a B.S.E.E. from the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Shuman is an ASEE Fellow.

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Abstract

An Inductive Qualitative Analysis of Student Interviews on Engineering Global PreparednessInternational experiences are viewed as an essential component of engineering education. Yetlittle has been done to operationally define engineering global preparedness, specify the variousalternatives for achieving global preparedness, or determine to what degree global preparednessis the result of personal attributes, prior experiences, or curricular/ co-curricular/extra-curricularexperiences. This paper discusses preliminary research findings from the second phase of aNational Science Foundation’s Research in Engineering Education (REE) initiative, a multi-university project that investigates how globally focused learning experiences within engineeringspecifically impact students’ global preparedness. This expanding body of research employsthree separate but integrated studies.This paper draws on undergraduate engineering student interview data collected during thesecond phase of the REE initiative, a mixed-methods quasi-experiment conducted in Spring 2014among the three collaborating schools. Following an extensive questionnaire that collected dataon students’ demographics, prior international experiences, and global preparedness as measuredby the Global Perspective Inventory (GPI) and Engineering Global Preparedness Index (EGPI), aselection of students were invited to be interviewed to unpack why they scored “high” or “low”on the two instruments. The purpose was to explore emerging themes related to engineeringglobal preparedness not captured by the questionnaire. The following research questions wereexplored. First, is cultural orientation and depth of curiosity something inherent in students, orcan it be expressed through international experiences? Second, how do students’ motivations totravel, reflectiveness, and openness to international experiences contribute to engineering globalpreparedness, and what types of international experiences best foster these elements inengineering students?Interview participants were selected using a cross-case matching methodology based on theirglobal preparedness measure score for both instruments (i.e., high vs low scorers). Twenty-sixundergraduate engineering students representing the three collaborating institutions were invitedand interviewed. Interviews were holistically reviewed with an a priori coding scheme in mindbased on the research objectives. An inductive coding protocol was then utilized to further refinethe coding definitions while allowing for additional themes to emerge. The preliminary codesconsisted of international experiences’ types and structures, motivations, openness to experience,degree of reflection. In addition, the Engineering Global Preparedness conceptual model(developed in previous work by the authors) was used as a prompt to identify attributes andoutcomes of international experiences that resonated with the students. The transcripts were thencoded according to the final coding scheme by multiple research team members for inter-raterreliability purposes, and arbitrated where necessary.This paper provides a summary of the results and how the research questions are addressed.Differences in students’ reflections emerged based on the depth of their engagement with theculture and community in the host country. The results from this study help broaden theknowledge base regarding the contextual factors related to global preparedness and offer theengineering education community insights into the dynamic interaction between students and theinternational experiences in which they participate.

Streiner, S. C., & McCave, E., & Levonisova, S. V., & Savage, R. E., & Besterfield-Sacre, M. E., & Ragusa, G., & Benson, L., & Matherly, C., & Shuman, L. J. (2015, June), An Inductive Qualitative Analysis of Student Interviews on Engineering Global Preparedness Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.23525

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