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An Integrated Signals And Systems Laboratory At The University Of Nebraska: Lab Philosophy And Study Design

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Conference

2003 Annual Conference

Location

Nashville, Tennessee

Publication Date

June 22, 2003

Start Date

June 22, 2003

End Date

June 25, 2003

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Course and Curriculum Innovations in ECE

Page Count

9

Page Numbers

8.208.1 - 8.208.9

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/11852

Download Count

44

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Paper Authors

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Srilekha Srinivasan

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Robert Palmer

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Michael Anderson

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Lance Perez

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A. John Boye

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2632

An Integrated Signals and Systems Laboratory at the University of Nebraska: Laboratory Philosophy and Study Design

Srilekha Srinivasan, Lance C. Pérez, Robert D. Palmer, Michael F. Anderson, A. John Boye University of Nebraska, Lincoln/Clarke College

Introduction

The Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln (UNL), is implementing an integrated signals and systems laboratory experience in its undergraduate curriculum. The laboratory experience uses a common experimental platform, the Telecommunications Instructional Modeling Systems (TIMS), throughout a sequence of four courses at the junior and senior levels. The four courses are in the systems area with an emphasis on communications systems. This laboratory and the associated study are funded by a Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI), Adaptation and Implementation (A&I) track, grant from the Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) of the National Science Foundation (NSF). An essential component of this grant is a formal study of the effects of this laboratory experience on student learning and teaching efficacy. This paper discusses the philosophy behind the laboratory and the design of the study and presents results from the first semester study.

We begin with a description of the four courses that will use the laboratory and the motivation for the creation of a laboratory that could be used in a sequence of courses. This is followed by a description of the platform chosen for the laboratory and the rationale behind this choice. The study methodology is then described in detail. Finally, results from the study for the course ELEC 304 Signals and Systems are given for the Fall 2002 semester.

Course Descriptions and Laboratory Motivation

The new signals and systems laboratory at UNL will be integrated into four separate three credit hour courses that are taught at the junior and senior levels in the undergraduate curriculum. The laboratory experience will be part of the three credit hours and does not replace any existing laboratory courses. The four courses are: 1. ELEC 304 Signals and Systems: The primary objective of this junior level course is to teach students time domain and transform analysis of continuous and discrete linear systems with the goal of preparing the students for subsequent senior level courses in communications, control and signal processing. 2. ELEC 305 Probability and Random Processes: The primary objective of this junior level course is to teach students the fundamentals of probability and random processes with the goal of preparing the students for subsequent senior level courses in communications, control and signal processing. 3. ELEC 462 Communication Systems: The primary objective of this senior level course is to teach students the theoretical foundations of amplitude and frequency modulation

“Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2003, American Society for Engineering Education”

Srinivasan, S., & Palmer, R., & Anderson, M., & Perez, L., & Boye, A. J. (2003, June), An Integrated Signals And Systems Laboratory At The University Of Nebraska: Lab Philosophy And Study Design Paper presented at 2003 Annual Conference, Nashville, Tennessee. https://peer.asee.org/11852

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