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An Online Real Time Quiz System For Readiness Assessment Testing

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

FPD5 -- Placement & Early Success

Tagged Division

First-Year Programs

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

12.232.1 - 12.232.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2396

Download Count

291

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Paper Authors

biography

Joshua Peschel Texas A&M University

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JOSHUA M. PESCHEL is a PhD student in Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University. He received the BS in Biological Systems Engineering and the MS in Biological & Agricultural Engineering, also from Texas A&M. His current research interests include unsaturated soil water transport, spatially-distributed hydrologic modeling, and emerging technologies in engineering education.

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Luciana Barroso Texas A&M University

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LUCIANA R. BARROSO is an Associate Professor of Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University. She is a graduate of Rice University and received her PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Stanford University in 1999. Dr. Barroso conducts research and teaches courses related to engineering mechanics, structural design, and earthquake engineering. She is also involved with the teaching of first-year engineering students at Texas A&M.

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Anthony Cahill Texas A&M University

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ANTHONY T. CAHILL is an Associate Professor of Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University. He is a graduate of Yale University and received his PhD in Environmental Engineering from Johns Hopkins University in 1998. Dr. Cahill conducts research and teaches courses related to surface water hydrology, numerical methods, and stochastic hydrology. He is also involved with the teaching of first-year engineering students at Texas A&M.

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James Morgan Texas A&M University

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JAMES R. MORGAN is an Associate Professor of Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University and was an active participant in the NSF Foundation Coalition and continues to be involved in the freshman program at Texas A&M. Dr. Morgan currently serves as chair of the Freshman Programs Division of ASEE. He earned BSCE, MSCE, and PhD degrees in Civil Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research includes structural dynamics, earthquake engineering, and engineering education.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

An Online Real-Time Quiz System for Readiness Assessment Testing

Introduction

Readiness assessment tests (RATs) are a simplified formative assessment tool to evaluate the incremental progress of individual learners in a classroom environment. Often times, a RAT is administered to measure the understanding of one or two general concepts from prior course material; it is also used to estimate the preparedness of each learner to move forward with new material in the current course lecture. As a means of individual formative assessment, RATs have shown promise as a feedback tool for learners within a variety of classroom environments.

RAT usage in the classroom was first proposed and investigated by Michaelson et al., who were evaluating individual learning in large courses within a business-related curricula1. Adaptation of the RAT concept within engineering education occurred later, most likely in the early 1990s, where it provided a modern placement of the traditional unannounced quiz into engineering education pedagogy. Since that time, engineering education researchers have shown the effectiveness that RATs may have on learner performance and, more importantly, improved learner understanding of the course material2.

Because RATs are usually paper-based and therefore require grading, the instructor cannot immediately adjust his/her content to the learners’ preparedness, even when classroom discussion is used to evaluate learner understanding. To mitigate this problem, researchers have developed near real-time feedback techniques for RAT scoring. Yost et al. solicited responses to RAT questions on scantron forms and then used a portable scantron reading device in the classroom for grading2. Other researchers have begun to utilize online course management systems such as BlackBoard and WebCT for RAT scoring and other course assessments3,4,5.

In each of the cases above, the RAT feedback results must typically be manipulated to have any type of immediate pedagogical value to both the instructor and the learners. Therefore, to transform the RAT concept into a real-time formative assessment tool, an online real-time quiz system was developed. The real-time quiz system administers the RAT electronically but also provides real-time feedback to the instructor both numerically and graphically in the classroom. Graphical results of the real-time quiz can be used immediately by the instructor to create ‘teachable moments’ that may better facilitate learner understanding of the course material.

Research Objectives

This paper presents the development and implementation of an online real-time quiz system to enhance learner understanding within a large, two-semester freshman engineering course sequence at Texas A&M University. The research objectives for this study can be categorized into two separate domains: technology and instruction.

Several web-based technologies currently exist that may be used to develop an online real- time quiz system. Among these technologies are: web databases, dynamic web pages, and real-

Peschel, J., & Barroso, L., & Cahill, A., & Morgan, J. (2007, June), An Online Real Time Quiz System For Readiness Assessment Testing Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/2396

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