Asee peer logo

An Undergraduate Research Project Testing the Properties of the Ground for the Design of Ground Source Heat Pump Systems

Download Paper |

Conference

2018 ASEE Zone IV Conference

Location

Boulder, Colorado

Publication Date

March 25, 2018

Start Date

March 25, 2018

End Date

March 27, 2018

Page Count

10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/29600

Download Count

17

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Kyle Frederick Larsen P.E. Eastern Washington University

visit author page

Dr. Larsen currently teaches mechanical engineering at Eastern Washington University. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering from California State University Sacramento and his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Brigham Young University.

visit author page

biography

Austin Arron VanWormer Eastern Washington University

visit author page

I am a student in Mechanical Engineering at Eastern Washington University, with an emphasis in Robotics and Automation. I have a passion for robotic integration and design, 3D modelling, and finite element analysis.

visit author page

biography

John Shine Eastern Washington University

visit author page

Graduated from Eastern Washington University in December 2017 with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. Now working at University Mechanical Contractors as a project engineer. I enjoyed working as a group on this project and feel like I learned some valuable skills and lessons from it.

visit author page

biography

Andrew William Phillips Eastern Washington University

visit author page

I am a recent graduate of Eastern Washington University with a Mechanical Engineering degree. This project was my last and most involved project during my college career. This project was a great learning experience for me. The subject of ground source heat pump system was a new concept to me at the time. After all the research and testing, I have a solid foundation of understanding this subject matter. I am happy to share my knowledge and experience with fellow peers and personnel. Thank you.

visit author page

biography

Terry Kriss Eastern Washington University

visit author page

Undergraduate in Mechanical Engineering at EWU. Aside from the typical experience at Eastern I've been active in promoting as much extracurricular as possible, mostly in clean energy and green technology. I founded the Alternative Energy Engineering club at EWU which organized students for the ground source heat pump capstone project. Additionally the club has had projects pertaining the EVs and is now building a series of wind turbines sponsored by the school and additional donors. I currently work for a utility on an EV charging pilot program and attempt to leave civilization as much as possible to recreate outdoors and explore.

visit author page

biography

Colton Widell Eastern Washington University

visit author page

I am currently a senior mechanical engineering student at Eastern Washington University graduating in March 2018. I am originally from Okanogan Washington where I learned to love math, science, and engineering through the great teachers at Okanogan High School. I have a passion for learning new engineering topics and applying them to real world applications.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Ground source heat pumps are a greener and cheaper alternative to the traditional heating and cooling systems for buildings. Instead of using as much fuel or electricity to heat and cool a building as a conventional system does, the ground source heat pump saves energy by using the ground or a nearby water source as a heat sink during the summer and a heat source during the winter. They tend to have more expensive initial cost but in the long run they save money and use less fossil fuels. Most heat pumps’ pipe configurations are buried under the ground where they will not be easily accessed at a later date. Because of this, the design of the configuration must be right the first time. This can be very difficult because the thermal property of the ground varies from location to location. The ground in one place might be mostly sand and a mile away the ground might be mostly clay, so it becomes very difficult to design configurations and they can be easily be oversized or undersized for the building depending on the thermal properties of the ground. This paper addresses an undergraduate research project that was done to test for the thermal properties of the ground before designing the configuration for a ground source heat pump. This was completed by five students using a low cost and simple system consisting of a pump, heater, tank, thermocouples, flow meter and data collector. The data was then collected using this equipment by flowing water through two different underground piping configurations. From this information a proper pipe configuration can be designed to best fit the needs of the building and configured to fit the available land on the property. This paper will address the methods used to collect the data as well as the analysis used to determine the feasibility of using a ground source heat pump. This will include an estimate of the cost savings along with the pay-back period and other considerations for a ground source heat pump.

Larsen, K. F., & VanWormer, A. A., & Shine, J., & Phillips, A. W., & Kriss, T., & Widell, C. (2018, March), An Undergraduate Research Project Testing the Properties of the Ground for the Design of Ground Source Heat Pump Systems Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Zone IV Conference, Boulder, Colorado. https://peer.asee.org/29600

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2018 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015