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Applying 2 D/3 D Visualization Technology In Construction Education: A Case Study

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Innovation in Construction Engineering Education I

Tagged Division

Construction

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

12.249.1 - 12.249.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1829

Download Count

59

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Paper Authors

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Zhili (Jerry) Gao

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Dr. Gao is an Assistant Professor of Construction Management & Engineering at North Dakota State University. He was an Assistant Professor of Construction Engineering Technology at Missouri Western State University. He can be reached at the Department of Construction Management & Engineering, 120 CME Building, Fargo, North Dakota 58105, 701-231-8857, zhili.gao@ndsu.edu.

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Virendra Varma Missouri Western State University

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Dr. Varma, P.E., F. ASCE, is a Professor of Construction, and the Chairman of the Department of Engineering Technology at Missouri Western State University. He has presented and published extensively in engineering journals and conferences. He is a Past President of ACI-Missouri, and a Past President of NW Missouri Chapter, MSPE of NSPE. He can be reached at the Department of Engineering Technology, Wilson Hall, 4525 Downs Dr., St. Joseph, Missouri 64507, 816-271-4562, varma@missouriwestern.edu.

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Eric Asa North Dakota State University

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Dr. Asa is an Assistant Professor of Construction Management & Engineering at North Dakota State University. He can be reached at the Department of Construction Management & Engineering, 120 CME Building, Fargo, North Dakota 58105, 701-231-7246, eric.asa@ndsu.edu.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Applying 2D/3D Visualization Technology in Construction Education: A Case Study

Abstract

Analytical principles of mechanics and strength of materials introduce students of construction at the sophomore or junior level to the fundamental principles involved in the analysis and design of typical components of structures. Unfortunately, students find it difficult to relate the external forces on a structural element, such as beams, ties, and columns, to the internal forces and deformations of that element. Research shows that computer-based Two-Dimensional/Three- Dimensional (2D/3D) visualization techniques offer new capabilities that can enhance a student’s understanding of how structures behave under various types of loading. For instance, computer animation programs allow processes of mechanics to be shown in motion. This paper reports the results of a study on the application of 2D/3D visualization techniques in the teaching of a course in mechanics of materials to the sophomore-level construction students. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of 2D/3D visualization techniques toward development of construction students’ understanding of structural response to different loads. The impact on student outcomes and future learning environment is also a part of the targeted data as more new technologies, media and tools become available to teach a new generation of students. Students enrolled in the course participated in a survey and provided their evaluations and comments on both the traditional and 2D/3D visualization methods of teaching. The methodology and data of this process may be used for other construction engineering or technology courses in the future.

Introduction

Analytical principles of mechanics and strength of materials introduce students of construction at the sophomore or junior level to the fundamental principles involved in the analysis and design of typical components of structures. Unfortunately, students find it difficult to relate the external forces on a structural element, such as beams, ties, and columns, to the internal forces and deformations of that element. Research shows that computer-based Two-Dimensional/Three- Dimensional (2D/3D) visualization techniques offer new capabilities that can enhance a student’s understanding of how structures behave under various types of loading.1 For instance, computer animation programs allow processes of mechanics to be shown in motion. Therefore, applying 2D/3D visualization techniques to the current mechanics courses, namely Mechanics of Materials, also called Strength of Materials, will provide students a learner-friendly environment, lower the difficulty of students’ understanding, and improve the retention rates of students enrolled in the construction curriculums. This paper reports the results of a case study on the application of 2D/3D visualization techniques in the teaching of a course in mechanics of materials to the sophomore-level construction students.

Purpose of Study

To enhance student understanding of structural behavior under load, 2D/3D computer-based visualization techniques are being utilized in teaching civil/construction engineering courses in engineering sciences and mechanics of materials. A study was conducted in Spring 2006 at

Gao, Z. J., & Varma, V., & Asa, E. (2007, June), Applying 2 D/3 D Visualization Technology In Construction Education: A Case Study Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/1829

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