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Applying Flip/Inverted Classroom Model In Electrical Engineering To Establish Life Long Learning

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

ECE Pedagogy and Assessment

Tagged Division

Electrical and Computer

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

11.223.1 - 11.223.11

DOI

10.18260/1-2--491

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/491

Download Count

748

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Paper Authors

author page

Larry Bland John Brown University

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Applying Flip/Inverted Classroom Model in Electrical Engineering to Establish Life-long Learning Abstract

Undergraduate engineering classrooms are experiencing changes as we strive to improve curriculum outcomes and develop students to meet the future challenges. Two important issues that face us are changing educational philosophies and techniques and the outcome requirements of ABET. Educational philosophies push us to consider a learner-centered approach over an instructor-centered teaching style. Research shows that students learn best when taught according to their particular learning style that may be dependent, collaborative, or independent. ABET has established the eleven program outcomes that all accredited programs must attain. Key to this paper is the professional skill of the “ability to engage in life-long learning.”

The professor as the lecturer has dominated the typical engineering classroom, but the challenges above push us to active learning approaches where faculty are facilitators and students are much more involved in their own learning. The “flip” or inverted classroom model requires that material typically taught in lectures will be moved outside the classroom and additional active learning scenarios are integrated into class times for improved learning. This model transfers much learning responsibility to the students and develops necessary skills for life-long learning.

This paper looks at how this teaching model has been applied into undergraduate electrical engineering classes. Course modifications will be discussed, and qualitative and quantitative analysis of the courses provided for outcome analysis and continual course improvements. The results from this classroom model have been positive and will be discussed. However, there are also some cautions that will be discussed to improve dissemination of this model into additional learning environments.

Introduction

Undergraduate engineering classrooms are experiencing changes as we strive to improve curriculum outcomes and develop students to meet future challenges. Two important issues that face engineering educators are changing educational philosophies and techniques and the outcome requirements of ABET. Active learning educational philosophies push us to consider a learner-centered approach over an instructor-centered teaching style. In addition to changing our teaching style, we have become aware of the different learning styles of our students. Research shows that students learn best when taught according to their particular learning style that may be dependent, collaborative, or independent.1 Course design must strive to integrate these elements of teaching and learning for all styles. Also, ABET has established the eleven program outcomes that all accredited engineering programs must demonstrate. Key to this paper is a learning environment that emphasizes the professional skill of “ability to engage in life-long learning.” 2

Bland, L. (2006, June), Applying Flip/Inverted Classroom Model In Electrical Engineering To Establish Life Long Learning Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. 10.18260/1-2--491

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