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Asce Student Chapters: A Contributor To Achieving Program Goals

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Achieving the Civil Engineering Body of Knowlegde

Tagged Division

Civil Engineering

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

11.231.1 - 11.231.13

DOI

10.18260/1-2--1179

Permanent URL

https://216.185.13.174/1179

Download Count

195

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Paper Authors

biography

C. Conley U.S. Military Academy

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Dr. Christopher H. Conley is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil & Mechanical Engineering at the United States Military Academy, West Point, NY. He earned a B.S. degree from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, in 1978 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Civil Engineering from Cornell University in 1980 and 1983. He is a past member of the ASCE Committee on Student Activities.

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biography

Decker Hains U.S. Military Academy

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Major Decker B. Hains, Ph.D., P.E., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, NY. He earned a B.S. degree from USMA in 1994, M.S. degrees from the University of Alaska Anchorage in 1998 and the University of Missouri-Rolla in 1999 and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Lehigh University in 2004. He is currently serving on the ASCE Second Edition of the Body of Knowledge Committee.

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Scott Hamilton U.S. Military Academy

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Scott R. Hamilton is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil & Mechanical Engineering at the United States Military Academy, West Point, NY. He earned a B.S. degree from the United States Military Academy, in 1984 an M.S. degree in Civil Engineering and an M.S. Degree in Engineering Management from Stanford University in 1994. He is currently a member of the ASCE Committee on Student Activities.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

ASCE Student Chapters: A Contributor to Achieving Program Goals

Abstract

An analysis is presented of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Policy 465 outcomes, their origins, and the ways an ASCE Student Chapter could contribute to their attainment. The authors draw on their experience serving on ASCE’s Committee on Student Activities, working with student chapters and clubs, and serving on the ASCE’s Second Edition of the Body of Knowledge Committee. Using their experience from reviewing student chapter and club annual reports from many schools over several years, from attending and observing numerous Regional Student Conferences, from running Workshops for Student Chapter Leaders, from participating in Practitioner and Faculty Advisor Training Workshops, and finally from serving as advisor for the USMA student chapter, the authors assess the contribution of student groups to attainment of Policy 465 outcomes.

Through community service projects, field trips, guest speakers, organizing and running local, regional and in some cases national events, and through the leadership opportunities offered in the ASCE student groups, civil engineering undergraduates can, and do, demonstrate that they are developing the skills and gaining experience in many of the areas outlined in the 15 outcomes of the BOK. When the student group has faculty and practitioner advisor participation, and takes on significant service projects and/or the running of events involving large numbers of participants, the learning and experience are at their best.

The educational opportunities presented by an active and well run ASCE student group cannot be matched in traditional classroom settings. In examining recent initiatives of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) regarding the future of engineering education, it is clear that many typical ASCE student group activities can contribute to meeting the recommendations of the NAE immediately, without significant changes to a program’s curriculum. Finally, ASCE student group activities can also be used to support civil engineering program accreditation, under both current and proposed criteria.

Introduction

Civil engineering programs, and the policies and guidelines for their assessment, continue to evolve. The latest activities in these areas are reflected in the American Society of Civil Engineer’s (ASCE) publication Civil Engineering Body of Knowledge for the 21st Century[1], the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) publication Educating the Engineer of 2020 – Adapting Engineering Education to the New Century[2], and the ABET, Inc. “PROPOSED Criteria for Accrediting Engineering Programs”[3] . In fact, Bruce Seely writes in the NAE report that “Engineering education has been the subject of more studies and reviews, formal and informal, than any other domain of professional education.” [2]

ASCE student group activities are a historically underutilized resource to civil engineering programs who are working to keep up with these changes. These student group activities are a place where many of the things that the above pundits are looking for have been, and continue to

Conley, C., & Hains, D., & Hamilton, S. (2006, June), Asce Student Chapters: A Contributor To Achieving Program Goals Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. 10.18260/1-2--1179

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2006 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015