Asee peer logo

Assessing Design And Reflective Practice In Capstone Engineering Design Courses

Download Paper |

Conference

2009 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Austin, Texas

Publication Date

June 14, 2009

Start Date

June 14, 2009

End Date

June 17, 2009

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

21

Page Numbers

14.237.1 - 14.237.21

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4909

Download Count

78

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Denny Davis Washington State University

visit author page

Professor, Bioengineering, and Co-Director, Engineering Education Research Center, Washington State University

visit author page

biography

Steven Beyerlein University of Idaho

visit author page

Professor, Mechanical Engineering, University of Idaho

visit author page

biography

Phillip Thompson Seattle University

visit author page

Associate Professor and Chair, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Seattle University

visit author page

biography

Jay McCormack University of Idaho

visit author page

Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, University of Idaho

visit author page

biography

Olakunle Harrison Tuskegee University

visit author page

Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering, Tuskegee University

visit author page

biography

Michael Trevisan Washington State University

visit author page

Professor, Educational Leadership and Counseling Psychology, and Director, Assessment and Evaluation Center, Washington State University

visit author page

biography

Robert Gerlick Washington State University

visit author page

Graduate Research Assistant, Engineering Education, Washington State University

visit author page

biography

Susannah Howe Smith College

visit author page

Director, Design Clinic, Smith College

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Assessing Design and Reflective Practice in Capstone Engineering Design Courses

Abstract

Engineering practitioners in the twenty-first century face complex challenges with social, political, environmental, ethical, and resource-limiting constraints. They work with diverse constituencies to solve rapidly-changing, complex problems. To be productive and responsive in this environment, engineering professionals must create innovative yet practical and responsible solutions that benefit society. As Schön (1983) argues, engineers will need to practice reflection- in-action (learning and adjusting as they perform) as well as reflection-on-action (intermittent analysis of conditions that leads to major advances). As agents of change, they continuously ask questions, make judgments, learn, and choose appropriate actions. Engineers must be competent, reflective practitioners if they are to contribute effectively in a dynamic global environment.

This paper describes a set of fifteen assessments for four areas of performance in capstone engineering design courses: professional development, teamwork, design processes, and solution assets. First, it presents the research foundation and structure for making the assessments useful for both guiding student achievement and measuring achievement in the context of team-based design projects. Next, the activities for each assessment are summarized along with factors for scoring performances. Finally, the paper describes how the assessments prompt students’ reflection on design activities and how student reflections might be used to assess reflective practice occurring in design activities. Assessment instruments are being tested for validity and reliability in a number of capstone design course environments. Additional research is needed to develop and test the measurement of reflective practice.

Introduction

Successful engineers of the twenty-first century will be markedly different from engineers of the past. Having sound understanding of engineering sciences, successful engineers will also need to be problem solvers and innovators who work effectively in times of rapid change. They will need to be global-minded, socially-responsible, systems-thinkers who adeptly address complex problems having significant human dimensions. [1-4] Engineers will need to perform a variety of roles in the context of their work: analyst, problem solver, designer, researcher, communicator, collaborator, leader, self-grower, achiever, and practitioner. [5] Important work in a “flat world” will require multidisciplinary teamwork, rapid prototyping, creativity, business savvy, entrepreneurship, and human-centered design. [6]

The social dimension of engineering will require excellent communication and social skills. Therefore, engineers will need to demonstrate strengths in listening, debate, and negotiation with

Davis, D., & Beyerlein, S., & Thompson, P., & McCormack, J., & Harrison, O., & Trevisan, M., & Gerlick, R., & Howe, S. (2009, June), Assessing Design And Reflective Practice In Capstone Engineering Design Courses Paper presented at 2009 Annual Conference & Exposition, Austin, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/4909

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2009 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015