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Assessing Individual Temperament and Group Performance in a Project-Based Learning Experience

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2018

Conference Session

Innovative Pedagogies for Facilitating Student-driven Learning Experiences

Tagged Division

Civil Engineering

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/27621

Download Count

19

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Paper Authors

biography

Jeremiah Matthew Stache P.E. U.S. Military Academy

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Captain Jeremiah Stache is an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, NY. He received his B.S. from the U.S. Military Academy, West Point; M.S. from both the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla; and is currently a Ph.D student at Mississippi State University, Starkville. He is a registered Professional Engineer in the states of Tennessee and New York. His research interests include finite element modeling of landing mat systems, plasticity in geomaterials, and engineering education.

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biography

Brock E. Barry PE U.S. Military Academy

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Dr. Brock E. Barry, P.E. is an Associate Professor and Mechanics Group Director in the Department of Civil & Mechanical Engineering at the United States Military Academy, West Point, New York. Dr. Barry holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Rochester Institute of Technology, a Master of Science degree from University of Colorado at Boulder, and a PhD from Purdue University. Prior to pursuing a career in academics, Dr. Barry spent 10-years as a senior geotechnical engineer and project manager on projects throughout the United States. He is a licensed professional engineer in multiple states. Dr. Barry’s areas of research include assessment of professional ethics, teaching and learning in engineering education, nonverbal communication in the classroom, and learning through historical engineering accomplishments. He has authored and co-authored a significant number of journal articles and book chapters on these topics.

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James Ledlie Klosky U.S. Military Academy

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Led Klosky is a Professor of Civil Engineering at the United States Military Academy at West Point and a past winner of ASEE's National Teaching Medal. He is a licensed professional engineer and works primarily in the areas of infrastructure, subsurface engineering and engineering education.

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biography

Gregory Martin Freisinger U.S. Military Academy

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Greg Freisinger is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the United States Military Academy at West Point. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Georgia Institute of Technology, as well as a Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy from The Ohio State University. Greg was an Army engineer officer prior to graduate school, with experience in combat and construction military engineering. His research is primarily focused on biomechanical factors associated with injury and performance.

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Abstract

An important aspect of the culminating events in most civil engineering programs is to ensure students can work in teams to solve complex engineering problems. In addition to solving problems in the multiple discipline areas of civil engineering and designing civil engineering components and systems, the civil engineering program at the United States Military Academy, West Point, seeks to develop students which function effectively on multi-disciplinary teams.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between individual temperament and group performance during the final project of an introductory infrastructure engineering course. A key component of the course is a group assignment to conduct a reconnaissance and assessment of a specified location’s infrastructure as a potential base of operations in the aftermath of a nuclear catastrophe. The authors employed the Keirsey Temperament Sorter to describe each student’s individual temperaments.

The team-driven project-based learning experience in the infrastructure engineering course addresses several of the program’s ABET student outcomes. The assessment of these specific ABET student outcomes include direct and indirect embedded indicators. Additionally, the peer evaluations provide a qualitative assessment of the interaction between team members with different individual temperaments and the overall effectiveness of the group.

Stache, J. M., & Barry, B. E., & Klosky, J. L., & Freisinger, G. M. (2017, June), Assessing Individual Temperament and Group Performance in a Project-Based Learning Experience Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/27621

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