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Assessing The Effectiveness Of Dual Delivery Mode In An Online Introductory Circuits Analysis Course

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Collection

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Online and Web-based Education

Tagged Division

Computers in Education

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

15.207.1 - 15.207.14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/15656

Download Count

51

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Paper Authors

biography

Amelito Enriquez Canada College Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-1259-0680

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Amelito Enriquez is a professor of Engineering and Mathematics at Canada College in Redwood City, CA. He received a BS in Geodetic Engineering from the University of the Philippines, his MS in Geodetic Science from the Ohio State University, and his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Irvine. His research interests include technology-enhanced instruction and increasing the representation of female, minority and other underrepresented groups in mathematics, science and engineering.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Assessing the Effectiveness of Synchronous Content Delivery in an Online Introductory Circuits Analysis Course

Abstract

A 2008 study released by the US Department of Education indicates that online enrollments are growing at substantially faster rates than overall higher education enrollments (12.9% vs. 1.2%), with over 3.9 million students (or over 20% of all U.S. higher education students) taking at least one online course in the fall of 2007. The study also reveals that among the eight major discipline areas examined, engineering has much lower online representation compared to others. One reason for this slow adoption of online teaching pedagogies in US engineering programs can be attributed to the perception by some engineering faculty and administrators that online courses are not equivalent in content and rigor when compared to the traditional, face-to-face courses. This paper presents the results of a study comparing the performance of on-campus and online students in a sophomore-level Circuits Analysis course in a public two-year institution. In this introductory course for all engineering majors, content is delivered simultaneously to on- campus students and online students (dual delivery mode) using a combination of Tablet PC functionality and Elluminate Live! software that allows synchronous delivery through the Internet, as well as recording and archiving of all classroom lecture sessions. Identical homework sets and tests were given to the two groups, and their performance compared. Results show that there is no statistically significant difference in the levels of performance of the two groups of students. Online students also rated their experience in this online class to be better than other online courses they have previously taken.

1. Introduction

Online teaching is one of the fastest growing trends in educational technology in the U.S. A 2008 study1 released by the US Department of Education indicates that online enrollments are growing at substantially faster than overall higher education enrollments (12.9% vs. 1.2%), with over 3.9 million students (or over 20% of all U.S. higher education students) taking at least one online course in the fall of 2007. The study also reveals that among the eight major discipline areas examined, engineering has much lower online representation compared to others. There have been many studies on the reasons why higher education faculty choose to adopt or refrain from adopting online teaching pedagogies2,3,4,5,6,7. Reasons for not participating in online instruction include concerns about academic integrity, and a perception by some faculty and administrators that online courses are not equivalent in content, rigor, and level of achievement of learning objectives when compared to the traditional, face-to-face courses7,8,9,10,11,12,13.

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