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Assessing the Spectrum of International Undergraduate Engineering Educational Experiences

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Collection

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees’ Poster Session

Tagged Topics

Diversity and NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

15

Page Numbers

26.253.1 - 26.253.15

DOI

10.18260/p.23593

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/23593

Download Count

42

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Paper Authors

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Mary E. Besterfield-Sacre University of Pittsburgh

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Dr. Mary Besterfield-Sacre is an Associate Professor and Fulton C. Noss Faculty Fellow in Industrial Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. She is the Director for the Engineering Education Research Center (EERC) in the Swanson School of Engineering, and serves as a Center Associate for the Learning Research and Development Center. Her principal research is in engineering education assessment, which has been funded by the NSF, Department of Ed, Sloan, EIF, and NCIIA. Dr. Sacre’s current research focuses on three distinct but highly correlated areas – innovative design and entrepreneurship, engineering modeling, and global preparedness in engineering. She is currently associate editor for the AEE Journal.

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Larry J. Shuman University of Pittsburgh

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Larry J. Shuman is Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Distinguished Service Professor of industrial engineering at the Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh. His research focuses on improving the
engineering education experience with an emphasis on assessment of design and problem solving, and the study of the ethical behavior of engineers and engineering managers. A former Senior Editor of the Journal of Engineering Education, Shuman is the Founding Editor of Advances in Engineering Education. He has published widely in engineering education literature, and is co-author of Engineering Ethics: Balancing Cost, Schedule and Risk - Lessons Learned from the Space Shuttle (Cambridge University Press). He received his Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University in Operations Research and a B.S.E.E. from the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Shuman is an ASEE Fellow.

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Gisele Ragusa University of Southern California

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Gisele Ragusa is a Professor of Engineering Education at the University of Southern California. She conducts research on college transitions and retention of underrepresented students in engineering and also research about engineering global preparedness and engineering innovation. She also has research expertise in STEM K-12 and in STEM assessment. She chairs USC's STEM Consortium.

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Cheryl Matherly The University of Tulsa

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Dr. Cheryl Matherly is Vice Provost for Global Education at The University of Tulsa, where she has responsibility for the strategic leadership of the university’s plan for comprehensive internationalization. Dr. Matherly’ directs the NanoJapan program, funded by the National Science Foundation in order to expand international research opportunities for students in STEM fields. She is the recipient of two Fulbright grants for international education administrators (Germany and Japan.) She has an Ed.D. in Education Leadership and Culture Studies from the University of Houston.

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Lisa Benson Clemson University

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Lisa Benson is an Associate Professor of Engineering and Science Education at Clemson University, with a joint appointment in Bioengineering. Her research focuses on the interactions between student motivation and their learning experiences. Her projects involve the study of student perceptions, beliefs and attitudes towards becoming engineers and scientists, and their problem solving processes. Other projects in the Benson group include effects of student-centered active learning, self-regulated learning, and incorporating engineering into secondary science and mathematics classrooms. Her education includes a B.S. in Bioengineering from the University of Vermont, and M.S. and Ph.D. in Bioengineering from Clemson University.

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Abstract

Assessing the Spectrum of International Undergraduate Engineering Educational ExperiencesInternational experiences are increasingly viewed as important components of undergraduate engineeringeducation. For accreditation, every engineering program must demonstrate that its graduates possess “thebroad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, envi-ronmental, and societal context.” While it is left to each individual program to define what this outcomemeans and how it would be measured, implied is a requirement that engineering programs begin to ad-dress “global preparedness.” Yet little has been done to define global preparedness, specify alternativesfor achieving it, or determine to what degree being globally prepared is the result of personal attributes,prior experiences, or curricular and co-curricular experiences. We investigate how international experi-ences both in and outside of formal curricula impact engineering students’ global preparedness. Buildingon previous work, we are investigating the diverse international opportunities available to U.S. engineer-ing undergraduates, and assessing the effectiveness of each. We are identifying ways to measure changesin global awareness, knowledge and thinking to address our research questions. The resultant informationand tools will provide insight to engineering administrators and faculty as they consider how to betterprepare their students for the global economy.This project is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team from the Universities of Pittsburgh, SouthernCalifornia, Tulsa, and Clemson with input from experts in the field of international engineering graduates.Our research involves three separate but integrated studies, of which the first two are complete. In Study1, we developed with experts an operational model of measurable attributes of engineering global prepar-edness. In addition, the experts helped to provide a comprehensive set of international experiences spe-cific to engineering education that were weighted to their perceived effectiveness in achieving global pre-paredness. In Study 2, we conducted a mixed-methods study among our collaborating schools. We didthis through a triangulation study using two established assessment instruments – the Global PerspectiveInventory (GPI) and the Engineering Global Preparedness Index (EGPI), each of which captures differentconstructs from the operational model developed in Study 1. Using statistical modeling methodology, wemapped these outcomes to educational practices, institutional characteristics, and student backgrounds us-ing an instrument developed as a result of Study 1. Then, we conducted a series of student interviews toexplore underlying experiences that contribute to achieving global preparedness. Study 3 involves con-ducting a larger cross-institutional quantitative study of 15 engineering schools to analyze the impact ofvarious international experiences, both within and outside the curriculum. Included in the latter will besuch experiences as military service, living internationally prior to college, or participating in an extendedservice project.This paper presents summarized results from the first two phases of our research, which is funded by theNational Science Foundation’s Research in Engineering Education (REE) initiative. Results from thisstudy broaden the knowledge base about how engineering students achieve global preparedness and thecontextual factors that influence this process. When completed this research will provide faculty with ac-tionable information about institutional factors, curricular and extracurricular practices that enable stu-dents to become globally prepared, and how global preparedness relates to student learning outcomes.

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2015 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015