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Assessment of Fundamental Concept in Thermodynamics

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Conference

2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Indianapolis, Indiana

Publication Date

June 15, 2014

Start Date

June 15, 2014

End Date

June 18, 2014

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Thermodynamics, Fluids and Heat Transfer II

Tagged Division

Mechanical Engineering

Page Count

22

Page Numbers

24.213.1 - 24.213.22

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/20104

Download Count

106

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Paper Authors

biography

Amir Karimi University of Texas, San Antonio

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Amir Karimi, University of Texas, San Antonio
Amir Karimi is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). He received his Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Kentucky in 1982. His teaching and research interests are in thermal sciences. He has served as the Chair of Mechanical Engineering (1987 to 1992 and September 1998 to January of 2003), College of Engineering Associate Dean of Academic Affairs (Jan. 2003-April 2006), and the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies (April 2006-September 2013). Dr. Karimi is a Fellow of ASEE, a Fellow of ASME, senior member of AIAA, and holds membership in ASHRAE, and Sigma Xi. He has served as the ASEE Campus Representative at UTSA, ASEE-GSW Section Campus Representative, and served as the Chair of ASEE Zone III (2005-07). He chaired the ASEE-GSW section during the 1996-97 academic year.

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biography

Randall D. Manteufel University of Texas, San Antonio

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Dr. Randall D. Manteufel is Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio where he has taught since 1997. He received his Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1991. His teaching and research interests are in the thermal sciences. He was the faculty advisor for ASHRAE at UTSA from 2002 to 2012. He is a fellow of ASME and a registered Professional Engineer (PE) in the state of
Texas.

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Abstract

Reinforcement of the Understanding of Fundamental Concept in a Thermodynamics AbstractMost engineering students have difficulty to explain the reasoning behind in theapplication of fundamental concepts used in solving thermodynamics problems. Forexample those students who solve a particular problem correctly, cannot explain why asteady state process is assumed in the problem solution; or why the kinetic and potentialenergies of flow is assumed to be negligible. Many students learn how to approximatethe properties of fluids in the compressed liquid region by their saturation properties, butwhen they are ask why v (T, P) can be approximated by the saturation property vf (T); u(T, P) can be approximated by the saturation property uf (T), why in th cv = du/dt, cp =dh/dT, they cannot provide a valid reasoning. We have developed a series of homeworkassignments and projects to enhance the student understanding of fundamental concepts.This paper will identify many of the areas that students have difficulty to explain thefundamental concepts. It will provide a number of examples and problem statement thatcan be assigned to enhance students understanding of the fundamental concepts.

Karimi, A., & Manteufel, R. D. (2014, June), Assessment of Fundamental Concept in Thermodynamics Paper presented at 2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Indianapolis, Indiana. https://peer.asee.org/20104

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