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Attracting, Retaining, And Engaging Faculty ? Trends In Engineering And Technology

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Professional Development and Scholarship

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

12.299.1 - 12.299.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1563

Download Count

13

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Paper Authors

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Patricia Fox Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis

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Pat Fox is Associate Dean in the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI. She is the school’s chief fiscal officer, and teaches courses in ethical decision-making. Pat is also co-director of the school’s international, interdisciplinary teaching and research initiative, GO GREEN, which emphasizes sustainable development. With H. Oner Yurtseven, she conducts annual ASEE-sponsored salary surveys on engineering and technology faculty compensation. Pat has been active in numerous leadership positions within ASEE.

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Stephen Hundley Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis

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Stephen Hundley is Associate Professor of Organizational Leadership in the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI. He teaches courses in leadership development, human resource management, and organizational research. Stephen is also co-director of the school’s international, interdisciplinary teaching and research initiative, GO GREEN, which emphasizes sustainable development. He is author of a book entitled Workforce Engagement: Strategies to Recruit, Retain, Reward, and Retain Talent, and maintains an active applied professional consulting practice where he assists organizations on their workforce matters.

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James Johnson Indiana University

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James Johnson is a graduate student pursuing his Master’s of Public Affairs from the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University, where he is concentrating in economic development. Prior to pursuing a graduate degree, he worked for the State of Indiana in the Department of Commerce. James has a research interest on the relationship between workforce development activities and economic development outcomes.

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H. Oner Yurtseven Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis

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H. Oner Yurtseven is Dean in the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI. As the school’s chief executive officer, he oversees program and faculty development, strategic planning, industry relations, research, and fundraising activities. With Pat Fox, he conducts annual ASEE-sponsored salary surveys on engineering and technology faculty compensation. Dean Yurtseven has been active in ASEE for many years, regularly attending and participating in conferences and events.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Attracting, Retaining, and Engaging Faculty: Trends in Engineering and Technology

Abstract

Finding, keeping, and motivating engineering and technology faculty is of paramount concern as U.S. institutions seek to fulfill their teaching, research, and service missions. This paper identifies compensation issues and other faculty opportunities and challenges, drawn from longstanding ASEE-sponsored salary surveys and other national studies on workforce engagement. Issues and trends in engineering and technology faculty roles and rewards are identified; ways to attract, retain, and motivate faculty are addressed; strategies to develop and enhance faculty capabilities are profiled; and the linkages between faculty work and the broader economic development climate and initiatives of the institution and surrounding community are discussed. Implications and considerations for engineering and technology faculty, administrators, policymakers, and other stakeholders are highlighted.

Introduction

According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, engineers (in all disciplines) held approximately 1.5 million jobs in the U.S. 2002 (the most recent year for which employment figures are available), while workers in the broad technology field held approximately 2.6 million jobs (including positions such as engineering technologists, computer systems analysts, database administrators, computer scientists, computer programmers, computer software engineers, and computer and information systems managers).

The need for a prepared, productive, and engaged engineering/technology workforce is well documented.1,2 Additionally, there is tremendous evidence to suggest that organizations that invest in their human capital – through explicit, employee-centered policies, practices, cultures, and approaches – tend to outperform rival firms.3,4,5,6 Institutions of higher education face a daunting task in attracting, retaining, and engaging faculty, primarily because of the competition for talent that exists in the broader employment marketplace.

The Context of Faculty Opportunities and Challenges

Any discussion of compensation, reward, and recognition issues in higher education must acknowledge the context in which faculty work continues to evolve. The American postsecondary system – including two- and four-year campuses; public- and private institutions – has been in a state of flux caused by many changes in the internal and external environments and rapid growth for nearly a half century. Most engineering/technology administrators and faculty leaders widely acknowledge that four main factors have been particularly critical in stimulating higher education institutions to rethink how they deliver educational services: demographic changes; increased demands for accountability; heightened expectations; and greater competition.

Fox, P., & Hundley, S., & Johnson, J., & Yurtseven, H. O. (2007, June), Attracting, Retaining, And Engaging Faculty ? Trends In Engineering And Technology Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/1563

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2007 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015