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Becoming A Student In An Asynchronous, Computer Mediated Classroom

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Conference

1998 Annual Conference

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 28, 1998

Start Date

June 28, 1998

End Date

July 1, 1998

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

3.119.1 - 3.119.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/6937

Download Count

24

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Paper Authors

author page

Donald J. Winiecki

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2555

Becoming a student in an asynchronous, computer-mediated classroom

Donald J. Winiecki, Ed.D. Assistant Professor Boise State University, College of Engineering

Abstract Graduate instruction is traditionally delivered in face-to-face classrooms in university settings. However, with the decentralizing of corporations and workforces in the late 20th century, potential students have been distributed far from traditional academic centers. Distance education is a viable option for these persons.

Asynchronous learning networks (ALNs) are an increasingly available option for distance education. However, ALN environments impose unusual constraints on the way individuals perceive themselves, their fellow students and their teacher, and how they interact as students and teachers. The transition from face-to-face classroom to ALN classroom is, as a result, tricky for students and teachers alike.

This paper describes characteristics of competent students in a face to face classroom and then contrasts them with problems typically experienced by students in an ALN. Solutions for these problems are described and used to create a model of instruction for helping students become competent and collaborative learners in an ALN.

Introduction Graduate instruction is traditionally delivered in face-to-face classrooms in university settings. However, with the decentralizing of corporations and workforces in the late 20th century, potential students have been distributed far from traditional academic centers. Faced with this situation, persons wishing to pursue continuing professional education have been forced to choose between employment, or leaving a job to attend school full-time.

Distance education has emerged as a viable option for these students. Instead of moving to the education, a student can have educational opportunities sent to himself or herself. Students can enroll in courses, participate in them, and graduate with degrees without every actually "being with" their instructors or classmates.

Many delivery options exist for distance education. For example, correspondence courses, compressed video or satellite television, and computer based asynchronous learning networks (ALNs) are common distance education delivery-systems. ALNs have the advantage of permitting students to participate in educational experiences in a “time shifted” environment. In other words, because students and teacher are not required to meet at the same time, ALNs permit students from different time zones, and with different work schedules to interact in the same “classroom.”

The skill of being a competent classroom student is a status and skill learned implicitly over many years of experience in traditional face to face classrooms. However, ALNs impose

Winiecki, D. J. (1998, June), Becoming A Student In An Asynchronous, Computer Mediated Classroom Paper presented at 1998 Annual Conference, Seattle, Washington. https://peer.asee.org/6937

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