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Big Fish Ii: The Lost Science Of Story Telling In The Engineering Classroom

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Best of the NEE

Tagged Division

New Engineering Educators

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

12.307.1 - 12.307.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1741

Download Count

32

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Paper Authors

author page

David Chesney University of Michigan

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

BIG FISH II: THE LOST SCIENCE OF STORY-TELLING IN THE ENGINEERING CLASSROOM

Abstract

The author has used story-telling extensively in the engineering classroom. A consistent request from students in end-of-semester evaluations is to include more stories in subsequent offerings of the course.

At the American Society of Engineering Educators (ASEE) Conference in Chicago, Illinois during June, 2006, the author presented a paper on the lost art of story-telling. The 2006 paper focused on why and when story-telling might be effectively used in the classroom. Examples include illustrating important points, giving coherent meaning to seemingly divergent topics, aiding students in remembering content, or simply breaking up a long lecture.

After the presentation at ASEE 2006, several members of the audience approached the presenter asking if they could acquire the necessary skills to become a good story-teller. This led to an interesting conversation as to whether story-telling is an inherent skill (like being funny) or an acquired skill (like telling a joke). In this paper, the author assumes that good story-telling is an acquired skill. Furthermore, literature related to story-telling methods will be briefly reviewed and the science (that is, the process steps) of good story-telling will be explained. In summary, Big Fish I told why story-telling is important. Big Fish II will discuss how to tell a good story.

Introduction

“Our lives are at once ordinary and mythical.” Natalie Goldberg2

“The role of the storyteller is to awaken the storyteller in others.” Jack Zipes2

“Everybody likes to tell a story. Little children do it effortlessly. Great artists do it with native talent and years of practice. Somewhere in between stand you and I.” Sylvia Ziskind.2

At the American Society of Engineering Educators (ASEE) Conference in Chicago, Illinois during June, 2006, I presented a paper on the lost art of story-telling1. The 2006 paper focused on why and when story-telling might be effectively used in the classroom. Examples include illustrating important points, giving coherent meaning to seemingly divergent topics, aiding students in remembering content, or simply breaking up a long lecture.

After the presentation at ASEE 2006, several audience members approached me asking if they could acquire the necessary skills to become a good story-teller. Oddly enough, I did NOT know the answer to this fairly obvious question.

Chesney, D. (2007, June), Big Fish Ii: The Lost Science Of Story Telling In The Engineering Classroom Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/1741

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