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Board 113: Evidence-based Resources that Scaffold Students in Performing Bio-inspired Design

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

9

DOI

10.18260/1-2--32193

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32193

Download Count

82

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Paper Authors

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Jacquelyn Kay Nagel James Madison University

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Dr. Jacquelyn K. Nagel is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering at James Madison University. She has eight years of diversified engineering design experience, both in academia and industry, and has experienced engineering design in a range of contexts, including product design, bio-inspired design, electrical and control system design, manufacturing system design, and design for the factory floor. Dr. Nagel earned her Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Oregon State University and her M.S. and B.S. in manufacturing engineering and electrical engineering, respectively, from the Missouri University of Science and Technology. Dr. Nagel’s long-term goal is to drive engineering innovation by applying her multidisciplinary engineering expertise to instrumentation and manufacturing challenges.

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Ramana Pidaparti University of Georgia

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Ramana Pidaparti, is currently a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at VCU. Dr. Pidaparti received his Ph.D. degree in Aeronautics & Astronautics from Purdue University, West Lafayette in 1989. In 2004, he joined the Virginia Commonwealth University as a Professor of Mechanical Engineering. He has taught previously at Purdue University campus in Indianapolis (IUPUI). He has taught several courses in design, mechanics of materials, optimization, and directed many interdisciplinary projects related to design. Dr. Pidaparti's research interests are in the broad areas of multi-disciplinary design, computational mechanics, nanotechnology, and related topics. Dr. Pidaparti has published over 250 technical papers in refereed journals and conference proceedings. Dr. Pidaparti received a Research Initiation Award from the National Science Foundation and the Young Investigator Award from the Whitaker Foundation. He is a member of Tau Beta Pi, Sigma Gamma Tau, and Who's Who societies. He is a member of professional societies including AIAA (Associate Fellow), AAAS (Fellow), ASME (Fellow), RAeS (Fellow), and ASEE (member). Dr. Pidaparti will move to University of Georgia in January 2014 as a professor of mechanical engineering.

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Christopher Stewart Rose James Madison University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4215-297X

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I do research on the development and evolution of amphibian anatomy and I teach courses on comparative anatomy of vertebrate animals, animal development, human development and evolution, scientific writing, and biology in the movies.

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Elizabeth Marie Tafoya

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Elizabeth Tafoya is a fourth year engineering student at James Madison University. In addition to engineering, Elizabeth has a minor in geology. She has participated in Bio-inspired Design for Dr. J Nagel since the Spring of 2017 to further her interests in design processes.

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Prabaharan Graceraj Ponnusamy University of Georgia

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Tyler Jeffrey Wahl James Madison University

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I am a student from James Madison University who is majoring in Engineering and Minoring in Mathematics. My current interests within the degree of Engineering are found in the Sustainability and Environmental field, but I also find myself wanting to explore the Biomedical and Mechanical fields as both have held my attention in the past. Outside of my academic life, I enjoy any outdoors activity including hiking, biking, and kayaking, along with playing my two favorite sports, basketball and volleyball. But whether I am studying in the department or out and about on campus, I always try to strengthen the connections I have with my friends and family, and spend any free time I can with them. The connections i have made in college are the most valuable parts of my life, because my friends and family have helped shape who I am, and they make me a better person every day. I owe my fortune of becoming an engineer and achieving my dream of helping people to all my friends and family for inspiring me to be me.

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Jessica Besnier James Madison University

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Jordan Claire Capelle James Madison University

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Abstract

To address the competencies of the future engineer undergraduate education must train students to not only solve engineering challenges that transcend disciplinary boundaries, but also communicate, transfer knowledge, and collaborate across technical and non-technical boundaries. One approach to train engineers in these competencies is teaching biomimicry or bio-inspired design in an engineering curriculum, which offers relevance to professional practice as well as an affective hook to frame complex, cross-disciplinary problems.  This research focuses on the development of instructional resources that provide exposure to the abundance of design examples that can be found in nature, as well as scaffold the discovery and knowledge transfer processes such that those natural designs can be used to inspire engineering solutions. The project work period is Fall 2015 to Summer 2019. Design theory, specifically Concept-Knowledge (C-K) Theory is used as the basis for the instructional resources. C-K theory is used as it is known for integrating multiple domains of information and facilitating innovation through connection building.  The instructional resources include lectures, in-class activities, assignments, rubrics and templates.

The instructional resources have been deployed at two predominately undergraduate institutions (PUIs) in the second-year engineering curriculum. The learning impact of the instructional resources was evaluated in two ways: (1) a comparative study of the C-K method against the popular Biomimicry Institute method, and (2) an impact study using a combination of correlation analysis and principle component analysis of the biomimicry and design learning attributes. Both studies resulted in significant results. Statistical significance was achieved for the hypothesis that the C-K method would produce higher quality solutions than the Biomimicry Institute method. This hypothesis was tested using parametric (student t test) and non-parametric (Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney Rank Sum) tests for each of the four metrics and the cumulative score of the four metrics. The results of correlation analysis based on University of Georgia and James Madison University students indicated that that the biomimicry process attributes- Biological knowledge, Defined dichotomy, Defining rough ideas and Transition from rough idea to sketch– had strong positive influence on the specific design engineering attributes of – Imagination, Innovation and Design Solution Definition. These relationships demonstrate that the design solutions can be innovative following C-K theory. These correlations also provide evidence to further the belief that biomimicry is a significant approach to enhancing engineering curricula. Our instructional resources have resulted in design concepts that more closely resembled biological inspiration, learning from nature to innovate rather than copying, as opposed to biological imitation that closely resembles the observable features of biological systems.

Nagel, J. K., & Pidaparti, R., & Rose, C. S., & Tafoya, E. M., & Ponnusamy, P. G., & Wahl, T. J., & Besnier, J., & Capelle, J. C. (2019, June), Board 113: Evidence-based Resources that Scaffold Students in Performing Bio-inspired Design Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. 10.18260/1-2--32193

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