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Board # 133 : Gamifying Cybersecurity Course Content for Entry Level Students

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/27736

Download Count

92

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Paper Authors

biography

Yin Pan Rochester Institute of Technology

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Dr. Yin Pan, Professor in the Computing Security department, received her Ph.D. in Systems Science and M.S. degree in Computer Science from Binghamton University. Dr. Pan holds four US patents in the areas of Network Quality of Services, Voice over IP and Artificial Intelligence. Since joining RIT in 2002, Dr. Pan has been actively involved in the IT security area, especially in security audits and computer forensics. Her current research interests include game-based digital forensics and memory-based malware detection using machine learning. She has published over 45 papers and presentations in research conferences and journals. She received grants from NSF, US Air Force Research Lab, and RIT. Dr. Pan teaches graduate courses in digital forensics and security audits.

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biography

Sumita Mishra Rochester Institute of Technology

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Associate Professor
Department of Computing Security

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biography

David I. Schwartz Rochester Institute of Technology (GCCIS)

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David I. Schwartz, Ph.D., a 1999 graduate of the State University of New York at Buffalo, published two textbooks on introductory computing skills while completing his dissertation in civil engineering, which sparked Cornell University's interest. So, in the summer of 1999, Schwartz accepted a lecturer position in the Department of Computer Science to teach computer programming and develop new introductory courses. Recognizing the academic potential of games, Schwartz founded the Game Design Initiative at Cornell (GDIAC) in the spring of 2001. Soon after, he designed the Cornell Library Collaborative Learning Computer Laboratory (CL3), which started hosting GDIAC courses in August 2004. In May 2006, these efforts established Cornell's Minor in Game Design offered by the College of Engineering, the first formal Ivy-League game design program. In the summer of 2007, Schwartz joined the Rochester Institute of Technology's Game Design and Development program as an assistant professor. In 2009, Schwartz joined his 17 other colleagues in founding RIT's Department of Interactive Games and Media, in which Schwartz's degrees in civil engineering and experience as a computer science educator paved the way for him to teach game programming, prototyping, design, and physical modeling. In 2011, the department became the School of Interactive Games and Media, in which Schwartz received tenure and promotion to Associate Professor. In 2015, Schwartz became the IGM School Director. Dr. Schwartz currently researches a range of applications of games: instructional design, game design, and and alternative interfaces.

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Abstract

The growing shortage of skilled professionals in cybersecurity and forensics has increased global demand for information systems professionals. In an effort to identify and attract more students to cybersecurity and forensics programs, the authors developed a game engine along with a GUI-based game creator to generate a sequence of entertaining, engaging, and educational games, suitable for forensics and cybersecurity courses. This multi-partner project is funded in part by the National Science Foundation under Award DUE-1400567.

This paper introduces the design and development of a browser-based educational game framework using game-based learning approach. Several digital forensic games will be introduced to demonstrate how students will conduct forensic investigation by following narrative and story-lines of the game via interactive dialogs and using real tools and technologies. The GUI-based game creator allows educators to create and develop new educational games in any subject field by only focusing on game content.

Pan, Y., & Mishra, S., & Schwartz, D. I. (2017, June), Board # 133 : Gamifying Cybersecurity Course Content for Entry Level Students Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/27736

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