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Board 144: PRIME: Engaging STEM Undergraduates in Computer Science with Intelligent Tutoring Systems

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32259

Download Count

29

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Paper Authors

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James C. Lester North Carolina State University

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James C. Lester is a Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and Director of the Center for Educational Informatics at North Carolina State University. He is a Fellow of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI). His research on personalized learning technologies ranges from intelligent tutoring systems and game-based learning environments to affective computing, computational models of narrative, and natural language tutorial dialogue. The adaptive learning environments he and his colleagues develop have been used by thousands of students in K-12 and college classrooms throughout the US and internationally.

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Kristy Elizabeth Boyer University of Florida

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Eric N. Wiebe North Carolina State University

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Dr. Wiebe is a Professor in the Department of STEM Education at NC State University and Senior Research Fellow at the Friday Institute for Educational Innovation. Dr. Wiebe works on many different facets of STEM Education, including the design and evaluation of innovative uses of computing technologies in STEM instructional settings, the use of multimedia tools for teaching and learning, and student engagement and persistence in STEM career pathways. Specific research programs include: the use of game-based environments to learn about computational thinking, the use of intelligent agents to support science learning in classrooms, and basic research in the how instructional technologies shape student engagement and learning. Since the integration of these technology tools are essential for their effective use, research is also being pursued at large scales, looking at how specific technologies influence teaching and learning at the classroom and school level and how schools and teachers can be supported to change practice in order to maximize the potential of these new technologies. Similarly, Dr. Wiebe is interested in how these innovative tools can be used in and outside of classrooms to enhance student interest in STEM learning and career opportunities.

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Bradford Mott North Carolina State University

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Bradford W. Mott received his B.S., M.C.S., and Ph.D. in Computer Science from North Carolina State University, where he is currently a Senior Research Scientist in the Center for Educational Informatics. His research focuses on game-based learning environments, intelligent tutoring systems, computer science education, and computational models of interactive narrative.

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Andy Smith North Carolina State University

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Andy Smith is a Research Scientist with the Center for Educational Informatics at North Carolina State University. His research focuses on the development and analysis of educational technology.

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Abstract

This project focuses on the design, development, and evaluation of PRIME, an intelligent tutoring system for introductory computing. We define computing as the creative design, implementation, and analysis of artifacts to solve computational problems. Leveraging advanced intelligent tutoring systems technologies, PRIME will provide integrated problem-solving and motivational support dynamically tailored to individual students over the course of their problem-solving sessions. PRIME is being designed to address the specific needs of STEM undergraduates in introductory computing courses. These students, most of whom are not computer science majors, exhibit a wide range of initial capabilities and dispositions toward computing. Many have had limited previous experience with computing, a problem that is particularly acute for women and underrepresented minorities. PRIME is being designed to address these important individual differences. The project has the overarching objective of transforming introductory computing for STEM majors by creating an intelligent tutoring system that provides individualized problem-solving and motivational support in order to improve the learning experience for these students. PRIME will track each student’s progress in learning computer science concepts and techniques while providing real-time feedback, multiple levels of hints, and customized problem-solving advice throughout students’ learning interactions with the system. It is being evaluated in introductory computing courses at North Carolina State University and Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, a Historically Black University. PRIME evaluations will center on investigating its effect on student learning of computer science (analyzing problems, creating models and abstractions, and building and refining programs), and its effect on students’ attitudes towards computer science (self-efficacy for computing and interest in computing).

Lester, J. C., & Boyer, K. E., & Wiebe, E. N., & Mott, B., & Smith, A. (2019, June), Board 144: PRIME: Engaging STEM Undergraduates in Computer Science with Intelligent Tutoring Systems Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/32259

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