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Board # 145 : MAKER: Use of Natural Products in Manufacturing Engineering Education at a Minority-based Land-grant Institution

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

Make It!

Tagged Division

Manufacturing

Page Count

8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/27762

Download Count

59

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Paper Authors

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Leanne Petry Central State University

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Dr. Leanne Petry is an Assistant Professor in the College of Science and Engineering at Central State University. Her expertise is in analytical and materials characterization techniques, including microscopy, spectroscopy, chromatography, and electrochemistry. Her research interests include oxidation-reduction reactions at the surface of electrodes for sensor applications, corrosion mechanisms of materials, as well as their electrochemical degradation. She has incorporated problem-based learning into her lectures, laboratories, and outreach activities to engage students and the community in the STEM education process.

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Augustus Morris Central State University

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Dr. Augustus Morris is the Chair of the Manufacturing Engineering department at Central State University, Wilberforce, OH. He is also the Program Director of the NSF funded grant, Implementing Pathways for STEM Retention and Graduation (IPSRG). His research interests include robotic applications in agriculture, haptic devices, high altitude balloon payload design, and cellulose-based composite materials.

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Cadance Lowell Central State University

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Dr. Cadance Lowell is a Professor of Agriculture at Central State University and Chair of the Department of Agricultural Sciences. Her duties have included teaching botany, plant physiology, horticulture, fundamentals of biology, medicinal plants, sustainable agriculture, and serving as the Director of the campus greenhouse. She received a B.S. in Botany from Duke University, a M.S. in Botany from the University of Florida, Gainesville, and a Ph.D. in Horticulture from the University of Florida, Gainesville. Research was in the primary metabolism and carbon partitioning in grapefruit and transmission electron microscopy of the source-sink pathway. She did post-doctoral work with the USDA in Peoria, IL as a biochemist in soybean oligosaccharides before joining Central State University in 1989. Dr. Lowell maintains a research program in directed energy weed control. She mentors undergraduate students in funded research projects who have gone on to present at local, state and national conferences.

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Abiodun Fasoro Central State University

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Dr. Fasoro is an Assistant Professor of Manufacturing Engineering at Central State University, Wilberforce, OH. He is also the coordinator of CSU’s Additive Manufacturing and Rapids Prototyping Laboratory. Dr. Fasoro is the Program Director of the Verizon Innovative Learning Program directed by Central State University.

Prior to joining CSU, Dr. Fasoro was a Research Engineer at Owens Corning’s Global R&D center in Granville, OH. Dr. Fasoro received his M. Phil in Metallurgy & Materials Engineering from The University of Birmingham, England and an MBA from Capital University, Columbus, OH. He also earned a Ph. D. in Mechanical Engineering from The University of Texas at Arlington. His current research interests and areas of expertise include digital fabrication, additive manufacturing, material characterization, reliability and thermal management of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and microelectronics. He is a member of ASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies.

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Ibrahim Katampe Central State University

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Anthony R. Arment Central State University

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Dr. Anthony R. Arment is a Professor of Biology at Central State University. His research areas include bioremediation, natural products, food science and science education.

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Abstract

This multidisciplinary effort is aimed at conducting research related to cellulosic materials derived from a variety of resources. It is of significant interest to the Central State University (CSU) community as a focus area for land grant research currently funded by agencies such as NSF and the USDA. Near-term processing of cellulosic materials requires them to be scalable in material properties for scaled up manufacturing purposes. The use of cellulosic materials is gaining favor in production applications because the synthesis and extraction of cellulose can be a green process from start to finish and is renewable in nature. The implementation and integration of natural products into manufacturing engineering education at CSU incorporates a local supply chain found in the Tawawa Woods that is sustainable and minimizes waste recycle. Thus, undergraduate students enrolled in the College of Science and Engineering search out suitable starting cellulosic materials for use in manufacturing applications. They investigate different natural and synthetic cellulosic materials and then initiate various surface, chemical, electrical and mechanical property measurements with these materials. They identify readily available starting reagent materials (natural and synthetic) that are appropriate for extraction of cellulose. Following identification of test reagents, a statistical experimental design matrix is compiled. The matrix used guides the synthesis and extraction experiments. It is possible that the resultant cellulosic fibers may accept the natural and synthetic colorants. The purpose of color enhancement is to determine feasibility and longevity of its use with different celluloses as starting electrode materials. Promising results may lead to production of novel biomaterials, polymeric materials, and composite materials as well as compliant sensing materials capable of being modified for different applications. Assessment results point to greater engagement of minority learners. These students tended to spend more than eight hours per week in the laboratories, often well into the evening, working on their manufactured samples produced from natural resources.

Petry, L., & Morris, A., & Lowell, C., & Fasoro, A., & Katampe, I., & Arment, A. R. (2017, June), Board # 145 : MAKER: Use of Natural Products in Manufacturing Engineering Education at a Minority-based Land-grant Institution Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/27762

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