Asee peer logo

Board # 155 : Developing Science Communication Skills as a Part of a Summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program

Download Paper |

Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/27785

Download Count

35

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Stephanie Ruth Young M.Ed University of Texas, Austin

visit author page

Stephanie Young is a doctoral student in educational psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research focuses on educational pathways to STEM careers, underrepresented minorities and females in STEM, and psychosocial influences on STEM learning. In her time at the University of Texas, she has worked with the Department of Mathematics and the Department of Biomedical Engineering on undergraduate student education initiatives. She draws on her experiences in technical recruiting and mathematics education to influence her research. Stephanie holds a bachelor's degree in mathematics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a master's in educational psychology from the University of Texas at Austin.

visit author page

biography

Margo Cousins University of Texas at Austin

visit author page

Margo Cousins oversees undergraduate and graduate academic advising at the Department Biomedical Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin. She directs the office in strategic academic and professional development advising, capstone projects program, research experiences for undergraduates, first-year interest groups, and other special programs.

visit author page

author page

Laura Suggs University of Texas, Austin

biography

Mia K. Markey University of Texas, Austin

visit author page

Dr. Mia K. Markey is a Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Engineering Foundation Endowed Faculty Fellow in Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin as well as Adjunct Professor of Imaging Physics at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Markey is a 1994 graduate of the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy and has a B.S. in computational biology (1998). Dr. Markey earned her Ph.D. in biomedical engineering (2002), along with a certificate in bioinformatics, from Duke University. Dr. Markey has been recognized for excellence in research and teaching with awards from organizations such as the American Medical Informatics Association, the American Society for Engineering Education, the American Cancer Society, and the Society for Women’s Health Research. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and a Senior Member of both the IEEE and the SPIE.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

The ability to communicate effectively is one of the most important skills for engineering students to develop during their undergraduate education[1]. Undergraduate engineering programs across the country are developing their students’ communication skills through novel approaches[2]. This paper examines the implementation and effectiveness of a unique communication intervention which aims to develop engineering presentation skills through a series of brief, video-recorded presentations. The participants were 11 students who participated in an NSF-funded summer research experience for undergraduates (REU) program. Students were asked to give a video-recorded presentation to the group in which they described their summer research project in three minutes or less on four occasions throughout the semester. After the presentation, students watched their recordings and evaluated themselves based on several dimensions of communication effectiveness. Student self-evaluation scores showed significant improvement over the course of the program (2(3)=16.860, p=.001). Students also rated themselves on the Scientific Communication Self-Efficacy Rating Scale[3] (SCSERS) on the first and last day of the program. The mean score on the SCSERS increased from pre- to post-evaluation. Qualitative student feedback is included for context. Strengths and challenges of the intervention design and implementation are discussed, as well as insights for future study.

References [1] “ABET Accreditation,” Accreditation Board of Engineering Technology, 2000. [Online]. Available: http://www.abet.org/. [Accessed: 25-Apr-2016]. [2] J. Williams, C. Carvill, R. House, J. Livingston, and A. Watt, “Grandest Challenge: Models for Communication Development in Technical Contexts,” Am. Soc. Eng. Educ., Jun. 2014. [3] C. B. Anderson, H. Y. Lee, A. Byars-Winston, C. D. Baldwin, C. Cameron, and S. Chang, “Assessment of Scientific Communication Self-efficacy, Interest, and Outcome Expectations for Career Development in Academic Medicine,” J. Career Assess., vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 182– 196, Feb. 2016.

Young, S. R., & Cousins, M., & Suggs, L., & Markey, M. K. (2017, June), Board # 155 : Developing Science Communication Skills as a Part of a Summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/27785

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2017 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015