Asee peer logo

Board # 157 : Using a Museum Exhibit as a Pedagogical Tool for Developing Reflective Engineers

Download Paper |

Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

Environmental Engineering Division Poster Session

Tagged Division

Environmental Engineering

Page Count

13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/27789

Download Count

72

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Roman Taraban Texas Tech University

visit author page

Roman Taraban is Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences at Texas Tech University. He received his Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Carnegie Mellon University. His interests are in how undergraduate students learn, and especially, in critical thinking and how students draw meaningful connections in traditional college content materials.

visit author page

biography

Danny D. Reible P.E. Texas Tech University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/https://0000-0002-3188-9709

visit author page

Dr. Danny D. Reible is the Donovan Maddox Distinguished Engineering Chair at Texas Tech University. He was previously the Bettie Margaret Smith Chair of Environmental Health Engineering in the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering and the Director of the Center for Research in Water Resources at the University of Texas in Austin. Dr. Reible holds a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology, and is a Board Certified Environmental Engineer, a Professional Engineer (Louisiana), and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2005 for the “development of widely used approaches for the management of contaminated sediments”. His research is focused on the fate, transport, and management of contaminants in the environment and the sustainable management of water resources.

visit author page

biography

David Emile Mesple Texas Tech University

visit author page

David Mesple' is a Professor of Art and Ideation, as well as a practicing artist. His work has been profiled in textbooks, periodicals, and critical reviews. Currently working on his PhD in Interdisciplinary Fine Arts, His areas of research are directed at investigating the psychological, philosophical, and neuro-biological bases of creativity and problem solving.

visit author page

biography

Francesco V. Donato Texas Tech University

visit author page

PhD Candidate, Cognition & Cognitive Neuroscience program.

visit author page

biography

Ibrahim H. Yeter Texas Tech University

visit author page

Ibrahim H. Yeter is currently a PhD candidate in the Curriculum and Instruction program at the College of Education, and at the same time, he is pursuing his Master's degree in Petroleum Engineering at Texas Tech University. He is highly interested in conducting research within the Engineering Education framework.

Recently, he received the Early Career Researcher Award from European Science Education Research Association (ESERA) in 2017. In addition, he is one of two scholarship recipients awarded by National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) to attend the ESERA summer research conference in České Budějovice, Czech Republic in August 2016. He has also been named as Jhumki Basu Scholar by the NARST in 2014.

Additional projects involvement include: Engineering is Elementary (EiE) Project; Computational Thinking/Pedagogy Project; Rocket Project; World MOON Project; East Lubbock Promise Neighborhood (ELPN) Project; and Robotics. He can be reached at ibrahim.yeter@ttu.edu.

visit author page

biography

Ryan C. Campbell Texas Tech University

visit author page

Having recently completed his Ph.D. through the University of Washington's interdisciplinary Individual Ph.D. Program (see bit.ly/uwiphd), Ryan is now a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Texas Tech University. He currently facilitates an interdisciplinary project entitled "Developing Reflective Engineers through Artful Methods." His scholarly interests include both teaching and research in engineering education, art in engineering, social justice in engineering, care ethics in engineering, humanitarian engineering, engineering ethics, and computer modeling of electric power and renewable energy systems.

visit author page

biography

Jeong-Hee Kim Texas Tech University

visit author page

Jeong-Hee Kim is Professor of Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at Texas Tech University. Kim is a curriculum theorist, teacher educator, and narrative inquiry methodologist. Her research centers on various epistemological underpinnings of curriculum studies, particularly engaging in hermeneutical excavation of the stories of students and teachers around the notion of Bildung, a human way of developing or cultivating one’s capacity. She received the Faculty Excellence in Research/Creative Activities Award from Kansas State University in 2011, and two awards from AERA—Outstanding Narrative Research Article Award in 2009 and Outstanding Narrative Theory Article Award in 2007. She has published numerous articles in top-tier journals including Journal of Curriculum Studies, International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, and Educational Philosophy and Theory. In 2015, she published a book on narrative inquiry, Understanding Narrative Inquiry: The Crafting and Analysis of Stories as Research, with SAGE publications.

visit author page

biography

Jill Hoffman Texas Tech University

visit author page

As the Assistant Director for Visitor Experience, and the Helen DeVitt Jones Curator of Education—both for the Museum of Texas Tech University (TTU)— Jill also is a faculty member in the graduate Museum Science program at TTU. Her museum career includes administrative, educational, and outreach experience at various museums, including The Millicent Rogers Museum, Taos, NM; The Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe; and the Austin Museum of Art, in Texas. She obtained her Ph.D., from The Pennsylvania State University, researching how museums interpret Native American art and culture.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Engineering educators are currently interested in the use of informal learning settings for developing reflective skills in engineers. The present study examined the effects of exposing engineering and non-engineering undergraduates to an exhibit at a university museum that focused on recycling. One goal was to test whether exposure to creative uses of recycled materials in everyday contexts made participants more sensitive to variables associated with reflective thinking in those contexts, like their sense of the utility of the recycled materials, the societal value of the recycled materials, and an appreciation for the process of recycling. A second goal was to test whether participants’ interpretation of the exhibit depended on how the experimenter framed recycling issues prior to participants’ interactions with the exhibit. The two forms of framing that were applied were a Government-Economy frame and a Community-Environment frame. The results of this study show that participants’ dispositions towards recycling changed after interacting with the exhibit. There was also a clear framing effect on participants’ beliefs about recycling. This research study provides one example of the ways in which engineering instructors can use out-of-classroom resources, like museum exhibits, in order to develop more reflective engineers.

Taraban, R., & Reible, D. D., & Mesple, D. E., & Donato, F. V., & Yeter, I. H., & Campbell, R. C., & Kim, J., & Hoffman, J. (2017, June), Board # 157 : Using a Museum Exhibit as a Pedagogical Tool for Developing Reflective Engineers Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/27789

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2017 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015