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Board 209: Adaptive Expertise: A Potential Tool for Supporting S-STEM Student Retention and Graduation

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Conference

2023 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Baltimore , Maryland

Publication Date

June 25, 2023

Start Date

June 25, 2023

End Date

June 28, 2023

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topics

Diversity and NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

7

DOI

10.18260/1-2--42622

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/42622

Download Count

117

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Paper Authors

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Alexander John De Rosa University of Delaware Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-1693-4724

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Alex De Rosa is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Delaware. His research focuses on improving the educational experience through the creation and promotion of new teaching tools and techniques. Alex is particularly interested in the areas of deeper learning and knowledge transfer, where he is working to help students better apply their knowledge and skills in new contexts, including in their future careers. Alex received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from The Pennsylvania State University in 2015 where he studied combustion instabilities in gas turbine engines and also served as a Graduate Teaching Fellow.

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Ashley Lytle

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Ashley Lytle is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey, USA. Lytle earned her PhD at Stony Brook University, New York, USA. Her research explores how prejudice, discrimination, and stereotyping im

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Maxine Fontaine Stevens Institute of Technology

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Maxine Fontaine is a Teaching Associate Professor in Mechanical Engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology. She received her Ph.D. in 2010 from Aalborg University in Aalborg, Denmark. Maxine has a background in the biomechanics of human movement, and

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Frank T. Fisher Stevens Institute of Technology Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4476-5040

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Frank T. Fisher is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering and the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies in the Schaefer School of Engineering and Science at Stevens Institute of Technology. He previously served as the Interim Department Director / Department Chair from April 2013 to August 2018. He earned BS degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mathematics from the University of Pittsburgh, and Masters degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Learning Sciences (School of Education and Social Policy) and a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Northwestern. His research interests include characterization of multifunctional nano-reinforced polymer systems, multiscale modeling of nanocomposites and materials, vibration energy harvesting/scavenging, and engineering pedagogy and instructional technologies. Awards that he has received include the NSF CAREER award, the 2016 Alexander Crombie Humphreys Distinguished Teaching Associate Professor award (Stevens), the 2014 Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award from the Stevens Student Government Association, the 2009 ASEE Mechanics Division Outstanding New Educator Award, and the 2009 Outstanding Teacher Award from the Stevens Alumni Association.

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Abstract

A recent self-study at [University] revealed that our 2nd and 3rd year retention rates for low-income STEM students are lower than those for our non-low income STEM student body. To address this finding the goal of our SSTEM program is to implement evidence-based best practices to increase retention and graduation rates of low-income academically talented STEM students to levels that match our overall STEM population. To accomplish this goal ADAPT we are seeking to: 1) implement best-practices with regards to cohort development and faculty, peer, and alumni mentoring programs to support the ADAPT Scholars, 2) develop targeted enrichment and mentoring activities focused on developing and nurturing the concept of Adaptive Expertise within our Scholars, 3) integrate new programming specific for low-income students with existing campus supports and activities, and 4) increase departmental and institutional awareness of, and support for, the challenges faced by academically talented, low-income students. We are seeking to determine whether contextualizing our cohort activities around the concept of Adaptive Expertise will both provide a unifying programming theme to maintain cohort engagement, and support students in the application of classroom knowledge in professional practice which will enhance their resiliency and sense of belonging which will positively impact retention. Here we will summarize a series targeted research studies seeking to characterize the levels of adaptiveness measured in low-income and non-low-income STEM undergraduate students using a validated survey instrument, including how adaptiveness may change as STEM students progress through their undergraduate programs.

De Rosa, A. J., & Lytle, A., & Fontaine, M., & Fisher, F. T. (2023, June), Board 209: Adaptive Expertise: A Potential Tool for Supporting S-STEM Student Retention and Graduation Paper presented at 2023 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Baltimore , Maryland. 10.18260/1-2--42622

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