Asee peer logo

Board 248: Developing a National Framework for Recognition of Engineering and Engineering Technology Faculty Instructional Excellence

Download Paper |

Conference

2023 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Baltimore , Maryland

Publication Date

June 25, 2023

Start Date

June 25, 2023

End Date

June 28, 2023

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topics

Diversity and NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

14

DOI

10.18260/1-2--42691

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/42691

Download Count

108

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Donald P. Visco Jr. The University of Akron

visit author page

Donald P. Visco, Jr. is the former Dean of the College of Engineering at The University of Akron and currently a Professor of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering.

visit author page

biography

Jenna P. Carpenter Campbell University

visit author page

Dr. Carpenter is Founding Dean of Engineering at Campbell University. She is 2022-23 President of ASEE and a co-recipient of the 2022 National Academy of Engineering Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Engineering Technology Education for her role as a co-founder of the Grand Challenges Scholars Program. Dr. Carpenter is an ABET PEV and past co-chair of the Undergraduate Experience Committee of the Engineering Deans Council.

visit author page

biography

Alan Cheville Bucknell University

visit author page

Alan Cheville studied optoelectronics and ultrafast optics at Rice University, then spent fourteen years as a faculty member at Oklahoma State University working on terahertz frequencies and engineering education, developing resources in photonics and engineering design. After serving for two and a half years as a program director in engineering education at the National Science Foundation, served as chair in the Electrical & Computer Engineering Department and secretary of the faculty at Bucknell University. At Bucknell he helped found the Maker-E, an electronic MakerSpace for students.He is currently interested in engineering design education, engineering education policy, and the philosophy of engineering education. He has served as associate editor on several journals, an ABET PEV, and on several national-level advisory boards.

visit author page

biography

Douglas Bohl Clarkson University

visit author page

Doug Bohl obtained a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the Michigan State University in 2002. After completing his degree, Doug worked for the US Naval Academy as a Research Faculty and at the Naval Surface Warfare Center Indian Head Division in Maryland as a Research Scientist. He is a professor the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at Clarkson University. Doug specializes in the development and application of optical diagnostic techniques for the measurement of fluid flows. He has applied these techniques to study problems ranging from the unsteady aerodynamics of airfoils modeled after the flipper of the humpback whale, to the motion of particle laden flows in pipes, to the aerodynamics of luge sled. Doug has also worked with graduate students and faculty to learn about and improve teaching throughout his career. Doug is currently directing a professional development group at Clarkson University for junior faculty and is a member of the ASEE Taskforce on Faculty Teaching Excellence.

visit author page

biography

Jacqueline A. El-Sayed American Society for Engineering Education

visit author page

Dr. Jacqueline El-Sayed is the Chief Academic Officer & Managing Director for the American Society for Engineering Education. She has leadership experience with the entire pipeline of engineering education and most recently served as the Chief Academic Officer & Vice President for Academic Affairs at Marygrove College. She is a professor emerita of mechanical engineering and served on the faculty at Kettering University for 18 years, eventually earning the position of Associate Provost. In addition to her work in academia she has served in industry and government. She is a four-time gubernatorial appointee to the Michigan Truck Safety Commission and, as commissioner, served as chair for two terms. She also chaired the Driver's Education Advisory Committee and the Motorcycle Safety Advisory Committee for the Michigan Department of State—work that resulted in new legislation for Michigan. She began her career as an engineer for General Motors Truck Group and has been nationally recognized in higher education as both an American Council on Education Fellow and a New Leadership Academy Fellow. Currently Dr. El-Sayed serves on the Bloomfield Hills Board of Education, serves as a director on the BHS Foundation Board and serves on the Advancement Committee for the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP). She is married and has three adult children.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

For more than 100 years, there have been calls at a variety of levels for faculty who teach in the fields of engineering and engineering technology (EET) to be trained in the best approaches to teach their students. And while this call begins has begun to be to be answered in some countries across the globe, in the US the professional development in teaching for EET faculty is sparse, at best.

One main reason for the lack of professional development of EET faculty as it relates to teaching is that the current reward systems in the US do not always value this training. In response to the 100 year old call, ASEE formed a Task Force on Faculty Teaching Excellence a few years ago with a main charge of developing a system where EET faculty can be recognized for their professional development in teaching.

Through an NSF-IUSE grant with the title “Developing a National Framework for Recognition of Engineering and Engineering Technology Faculty Instructional Excellence”, the Task Force has engaged with a variety of constituencies within ASEE (e.g., various divisions and councils), at a variety of events (e.g., sectional meetings, council meetings, annual meetings), using a variety of approaches (e.g., ASEE Town Hall, ASEE Prism, ASEE videos, exhibition booth) and a variety of feedback mechanisms (e.g. focus groups, surveys and Town Hall feedback). This education, engagement and feedback strategy has led the Task Force to develop (and modify) a draft three-level framework to recognize faculty professional development in teaching. The framework drafted is structured in a hierarchical approach, where knowledge (Level 1) creates the foundation, application (Level 2) demonstrates the use of the knowledge gained and leadership (Level 3) looks to expand the impact beyond an individual and their own students.

In this poster presentation, we describe the past efforts of the Task Force, the modifications made in the original framework based on feedback and the current draft framework with the three-level structure.

Visco, D. P., & Carpenter, J. P., & Cheville, A., & Bohl, D., & El-Sayed, J. A. (2023, June), Board 248: Developing a National Framework for Recognition of Engineering and Engineering Technology Faculty Instructional Excellence Paper presented at 2023 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Baltimore , Maryland. 10.18260/1-2--42691

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2023 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015