Asee peer logo

Board 257: Development and Initial Outcomes of an NSF RIEF Project in Understanding Teamwork Experience and its Linkage to Engineering Identity of Diverse Students

Download Paper |

Conference

2023 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Baltimore , Maryland

Publication Date

June 25, 2023

Start Date

June 25, 2023

End Date

June 28, 2023

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topics

Diversity and NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

12

DOI

10.18260/1-2--42703

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/42703

Download Count

70

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Yiyi Wang

visit author page

Yiyi Wang is an assistant professor of civil engineering at San Francisco State University. In addition to engineering education, her research also focuses on the nexus between mapping, information technology, and transportation and has published in Accident Analysis & Prevention, Journal of Transportation Geography, and Annuals of Regional Science. She served on the Transportation Research Board (TRB) ABJ80 Statistical Analysis committee and the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) panel. She advises the student chapter of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) at SFSU.

visit author page

biography

Stephanie Claussen San Francisco State University

visit author page

Stephanie Claussen is an Assistant Professor in the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University. She previously spent eight years as a Teaching Professor in the Engineering, Design, and Society Division and the Electrical Engineering Departmen

visit author page

biography

Xiaorong Zhang San Francisco State University

visit author page

Xiaorong Zhang received the B.S. degree in computer science from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China, in 2006, the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees in computer engineering from University of Rhode Island, Kingston, in 2009 and 2013 respectivel

visit author page

biography

Fatemeh Khalkhal

visit author page

Dr. Khalkhal is an assistant professor in mechanical engineering at San Francisco State University (a primarily undergraduate and Hispanic-serving Institution). Her research experience is in developing structure-property relationships in complex fluids and polymer composites, broadening the participation of women and underrepresented minorities in engineering, and understanding the relationship between teamwork experience and team disagreements in the formation of engineering identity among diverse students.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Engineering identity is a crucial element in the formation of engineering students. It represents how strongly a student identifies with being an engineer and indicates persistence and retention in engineering. Many factors influence the development of an engineering identity; for example, students from diverse backgrounds (transfer, first-generation, one with a disability, female, or minority students) may face challenges in performance expectations, resource access, and peer interactions. Such experiences can hamper their engineering identity development, retention, and advancement in engineering. These challenges also manifest in engineering teamwork, where students are expected to apply and acquire engineering skills, assert themselves, and navigate unfamiliar team dynamics.

Many engineering education studies have stressed the importance of teamwork training in undergraduate engineering education. They have investigated how teamwork experiences promote learning, technical communication, metacognitive ability, social-technical thinking, and other skills. However, little is known about how teamwork informs or is informed by students’ engineering identities. Understanding the connection between teamwork and the engineering identity of diverse students, especially among underrepresented groups, enables instructors to create inclusive teaching and learning environments. Such learning environments improve student performance and promote interest and recognition, which are crucial to a student’s professional formation.

Funded by the Research Initiation in Engineering Formation (RIEF) program of the National Science Foundation, our project aims to (1) depict teamwork experience through the behaviors of and disagreements between team members in a highly diverse engineering student population at a four-year Hispanic Serving Institution;. and (2) understand how teamwork experience informs students’ engineering identities using a mixed-methods approach. During the first year of the project, the research team designed a survey instrument and an interview protocol to measure students’ engineering identity and teamwork experiences. Survey and interview data has been collected from 18 engineering classes. Our mixed-methods approach consisted of quantitative and qualitative methods. This paper summarizes the preliminary results and initial findings of this study.

Wang, Y., & Claussen, S., & Zhang, X., & Khalkhal, F. (2023, June), Board 257: Development and Initial Outcomes of an NSF RIEF Project in Understanding Teamwork Experience and its Linkage to Engineering Identity of Diverse Students Paper presented at 2023 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Baltimore , Maryland. 10.18260/1-2--42703

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2023 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015