Asee peer logo

Board 30: Sustainable Bridges from Campus to Campus: Outcomes for Two Cohorts of Jump Start Second-year Bridge Participants (#1525367)

Download Paper |

Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topics

Diversity and NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32320

Download Count

6

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Catherine L. Cohan Pennsylvania State University, University Park

visit author page

Catherine Cohan holds a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology and has been a research psychologist for over 20 years. Her areas of expertise include engineering education, retention of underrepresented students, measurement, and assessment. She is currently an Assistant Research Professor on the Sustainable Bridges NSF IUSE project (Peter Butler, PI). Previously, she was the project coordinator the the Toys'n MORE NSF STEP project (Renata Engel, PI).

visit author page

biography

Pradip K. Bandyopadhyay Pennsylvania State University, Berks Campus

visit author page

Professor of Physics & Division Head of Science
Penn State Berks
Reading, PA 19610

visit author page

biography

Ryan Scott Hassler

visit author page

Instructor of Mathematics

Research Interests: Algebraic Knowledge for Elementary School Teaching, Facilitating Mathematical Connection-Making Opportunities, College Calculus-Ready Predictors, First Year STEM Experience, Engineering Education

MS Applied Statistics
PhD Mathematics & Science Education

visit author page

biography

Mark William Johnson Pennsylvania State University, Altoona Campus

visit author page

Mark W. Johnson is Professor of Mathematics with primary research areas in Algebraic Topology and Category Theory, as
well as an ongoing interest in preparing future engineers, especially those from under-represented groups, for the mathematical challenges inherent in their chosen degree.

visit author page

biography

Mikhail Kagan Pennsylvania State University, Abington Campus

visit author page

Mikhail (Mike) Kagan is an associate professor of physics at Penn State Abington. He received a Ph.D. in Physics from the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Kagan's research interests are diverse and include Quantum Gravity and Cosmology, Physical Applications of Graph Theory, as well as Physics Education. Dr. Kagan has over twenty years of experience teaching math, physics an astronomy at middle, high school and university level. For the last several years, he has implemented Investigative Science Learning Environment (ISLE) in his classes.

visit author page

author page

Ann Marie Schmiedekamp

biography

Peter J. Shull Pennsylvania State University, Altoona Campus

visit author page

Dr. Peter J. Shull is an associate professor of engineering at Penn State University. He received his undergraduate degree from Bucknell University in mechanical engineering and his graduate degrees from The Johns Hopkins University in engineering science. Dr. Shull’s research has two main foci—nondestructive evaluation methods as applied to process control (NDE) and pedagogical methodology. Dr. Shull’s pedagogical efforts include meta-cognitive strategy learning to improve student academic success, an interest in women’s issues within the engineering environment, integrated, experiential techniques to improve engineering students’ social emotional development as applied to teamwork and communication, and program assessment methods that minimize stakeholders’ efforts while maximizing the effectiveness of the measurement tool.

visit author page

author page

Peter J. Butler Pennsylvania State University, University Park

biography

Helen Edson Pennsylvania State University

visit author page

For the past 22 years, Helen has been a student advocate in Penn State's College of Engineering. The majority of those years she has spent in the Engineering Outreach and Inclusion office with a strong focus on recruitment and retention of underrepresented and high risk students. A great deal of focus has been as a scholarship steward assisting all students in obtaining financial assistance. She has been a long time advisor to both the National Society of Black Engineers and the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers. For the past two years, she has served as the Director of Campus Outreach serving a large population of engineering students starting at one of Penn State's 24 regional campuses and transitioning to the much larger University Park campus in their junior year to complete their degree. Helen oversees several retention programs including the Jump Start second-year bridge.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the Sustainable Bridges from Campus to Campus study (NSF IUSE #1525367) is to increase the retention of racially underrepresented students (i.e., African American, Native American, and Hispanic students) in undergraduate Engineering majors at Penn State. We strive to address the urgent need to expand and diversify the pool of undergraduates who earn a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) degree. To achieve this goal, the Sustainable Bridges project consists of a comprehensive series of interventions including the Engineering Ahead first-year summer bridge program, the Jump Start second-year summer bridge program, and a transition program for juniors changing from a University regional campus to the University flagship campus. As of this writing, we are completing Year 3 of the 5-year project. Previous papers described outcomes for the first-year bridge program. This paper describes outcomes for two cohorts of students who participated in the Jump Start second-year summer bridge intervention.

Goals: To improve retention in Engineering, this project will conduct academic enrichment programs for racially underrepresented Engineering students at three points in their career at the University—entering first-year students, rising second-year students, and rising juniors. The goals of the study are to (a) increase retention in Engineering among racially underrepresented students in the University system, (b) develop long-term sustainability plans for these enrichment programs, and (c) compare retention rates in Engineering depending on whether students attended a summer academic enhancement program at the regional campus they attend in the fall or at a different campus and whether they transfer between campuses within the University system (native students vs. 2+2 students).

Method: The Jump Start summer bridge is a 4-week residential program on the University flagship campus for rising second-year Engineering students throughout the University system to prepare them for Calculus II, Differential Equations, Physics I or Physics II. The program also focuses on cohort building. Enrollment priority is given to racially underrepresented students, those who participated in the Engineering Ahead first-year bridge program, and those from a University regional campus. To assess the effectiveness of Jump Start for the first two cohorts (N = 93), we will compare participants to a sample of students who did not participate in Jump Start who were matched on sex, race/ethnicity, major, campus assignment, and SAT Math scores, for a total sample of 186 students. We compare the two groups on fall-semester math and physics course grades, fall semester grade point average, and enrollment status. We also examine the entrance-to-major status for Cohort 1 for retention in Engineering, retention in STEM, and retention at the University.

Results: Analyses are being conducted at present.

Conclusions: Conclusions are pending following completion of data analysis.

Cohan, C. L., & Bandyopadhyay, P. K., & Hassler, R. S., & Johnson, M. W., & Kagan, M., & Schmiedekamp, A. M., & Shull, P. J., & Butler, P. J., & Edson, H. (2019, June), Board 30: Sustainable Bridges from Campus to Campus: Outcomes for Two Cohorts of Jump Start Second-year Bridge Participants (#1525367) Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/32320

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2019 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015