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Board 35:Metacognition: Helping Students Plan, Monitor, and Evaluate Study Skills and Strategies

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Conference

2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 23, 2018

Start Date

June 23, 2018

End Date

July 27, 2018

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/30015

Download Count

87

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Paper Authors

biography

Muhammad Dawood New Mexico State University

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Dr. Muhammad Dawood received his BE degree from the NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, Pakistan, 1985, and his MS and Ph.D. degrees, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, in 1998 and 2001, respectively, both in electrical engineering. Dr. Dawood is involved in teaching both nationally and internationally since 1995. At present, Dr. Dawood is an Associate Professor at the Klipsch School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Mexico State University (NMSU), Las Cruces, New Mexico. Dr. Dawood's research interests lie in the area of Engineering Education, EM Propagation through Dispersive media; radar; and Antennas; He is a member of IEEE.

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Karen Trujillo New Mexico State University

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Dr. Karen Trujillo has been an educator for over 20 years. She started as a teacher, became an administrator and has been a research faculty member at NMSU for six years. She has been a PI and Co-PI of multiple NSF grants focused on STEM Education. She is the director of The Alliance for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning and recently started the STEM Outreach Alliance Research Lab (SOAR) to study the impact of STEM Outreach efforts at NMSU. She also serves as the State Director for Educators Rising NM and the Co-Chair of the New Mexico Math and Science Partnership.

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Patti Wojahn New Mexico State University

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As past Writing Program Administrator, I worked closely with many academic departments interested in supporting the writing and communication abilities of their students. For many years, I worked with Integrated Learning Communities for at-risk entry-level engineering majors, overseeing development and use of a curriculum adapted specifically for this group. I continue to analyze data from research studies exploring challenges and identifying at-risk characteristics among students in first-year writing courses. Presently, I work on an initiative focused on writing in the disciplines as part of our university’s Higher Learning Commission 10-year re-accreditation cycle. As Borderlands Writing Project Director, I also work with K-16 teachers to strengthen quality in using writing in their courses to help students learn, regardless of discipline.

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Melissa J. Guynn New Mexico State University

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I am a cognitive psychologist with a primary interest in human memory.

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Luis Manuel Rangel Jr.

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S. M. Yahea Mahbub New Mexico State University

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Abstract

In STEM education, much attention has been paid to the roles of instructors, pedagogy, and curriculum in student learning, with less attention paid to the role of student characteristics. Yet students' own beliefs, choices, practices, and behaviors can affect their academic outcomes. Applying research on learning from education and the social and behavioral sciences is only now taking hold in undergraduate engineering education, one of five major shifts in engineering education over the past 100 years. In addition, engineering education to date has not drawn widely on the existing research on metacognition— monitoring, understanding, and controlling thoughts that can lead to more productive behavior and practices. In 2016, our multi-disciplinary team of researchers at New Mexico State University (NMSU) embarked on a study of metacognition and “learning how to learn” among Engineering students. Preliminary data indicated that 75% of Freshmen, 50% of Sophomores, and 35% of Juniors do not routinely adopt effective study strategies. Preliminary analysis of data reveals a letter grade lower achievement of those who did not adopt effective study strategies. Our NSF-funded research project focuses on Freshman students, many from underrepresented groups, in NMSU’s innovative 1st-year “engineering experience” program. We are developing minimally-intrusive interventions, involving a workshop, handouts, and reflective writing, designed to improve students’ metacognitive awareness (their ability to monitor and control their own learning) and knowledge of effective study strategies, and thereby their learning both within and outside the classroom. We will present pretest and posttest results for students who did receive the metacognitive awareness and study strategy intervention versus those who did not.

Dawood, M., & Trujillo, K., & Wojahn, P., & Guynn, M. J., & Rangel, L. M., & Mahbub, S. M. Y. (2018, June), Board 35:Metacognition: Helping Students Plan, Monitor, and Evaluate Study Skills and Strategies Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/30015

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