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Board 40: Developing a Culturally Adaptive Pathway to Success

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topics

Diversity and NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32342

Download Count

3

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Paper Authors

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Eun-Young Kang California State University, Los Angeles

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Eun-Young Elaine Kang, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Computer Science of the College of Engineering, Computer Science and Technology at Cal State LA. Her research interests are in Computer Vision, Computer Graphics, Augmented/Mixed Realty, and Game Programming. She has served as principal undergraduate advisor for the Computer Science department for several years. Also, she has served as PI/Co-PI on multiple educational projects sponsored by NSF programs including NSF S-STEM, NSF GK-12, and NSF TUES.

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Jianyu Dong California State University, Los Angeles

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Jianyu Dong is a professor in electrical and computer engineering and currently serves as the Associate Dean for the College of Engineering, Computer Science, and Technology at Cal State LA. Her area of expertise is video compression/communication, multimedia networks, QoS, etc. With a strong passion in Engineering Education, she has been engaged in multiple funded projects and initiatives to increase the participation and success of students from undeserved, low-income communities in engineering areas.

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Matthew C. Jackson Ph.D. California State University, Los Angeles

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Matthew Jackson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at California State University,
Los Angeles. His research examines how the intersections of social identities shape the academic attitudes and behaviors of students.

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Emily L. Allen California State University, Los Angeles

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Emily L. Allen, Ph.D., is Dean of the College of Engineering, Computer Science, and Technology at California State University, Los Angeles. She earned her BS in metallurgy and materials science from Columbia University, and her MS and PhD in materials science and engineering from Stanford University. She previously served as faculty, chair and Associate Dean at San Jose State University's College of Engineering. Dr. Allen believes in a collaborative, student-centered approach to research, education and academic administration and leadership. She currently serves on the ASEE Engineering Deans Council Executive Board, the ABET Academic Affairs Council, and chairs the ABET Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion.

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Gerardo Lopez California State University, Los Angeles

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Gerardo Lopez is a Professional Academic Advisor for the College of Engineering, Computer Science and Technology (ECST) at Cal State LA. He currently serves as the primary Academic Advisor for the First Year Experience at ECST Program (FYrE), the CAPS NSF SSTEM project and the College of ECST Advising Center (ESSC) where his main focus is to help students reach their academic, career and professional goals.

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Abstract

The financial disadvantage of many students at the [College Name, University Name] is often connected with inadequate academic preparation through K-12 education and limited family guidance. Hence, many students, including those who are academically-talented, experience significant challenges in achieving their academic goals. With support from NSF Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM), the Culturally Adaptive Pathway to Success (CAPS) program aims to build an inclusive pathway to accelerate the graduation for academically talented, low-income students in Engineering and Computer Science majors at [University Name], which traditionally serves the underrepresented and educationally disadvantaged minority students in the [City Name area].

CAPS focuses on progressively developing social and career competence in our students via three integrated interventions: (1) Mentor+, a relationally informed advising strategy that encourages students to see their academic work in relation to their families and communities; (2) peer cohorts, providing social support structure for students and enhancing their sense of belonging in engineering and computer science classrooms and beyond; and (3) professional development from faculty who have been trained in difference-education theory, so that they can support students with varying levels of understanding of the antecedents of college success. The program has been implementing these interventions through a variety of activities including Mentor+ advisement sessions, field trips, professional seminars, a sophomore learning cluster, and participation by scholars in professional conferences. To ensure success of these interventions, the CAPS program places great emphasis on developing culturally responsive advisement methods and training faculty mentors to facilitate creating a culture of culturally adaptive advising.

The educational research side of the CAPS program focuses on studying (a) how these interventions affect the development of social belonging and engineering identity of CAPS scholars, and (b) the impact of Mentor+ on academic resilience and progress to degree. The findings will help enhance the CAPS program and establish a sustainable Scholars Support Program at the university, which can be implemented with scholarships funded by other sources, and which can be transferred to similar culturally diverse institutions to increase success for students who have socio-economic challenges.

This paper presents our current progress and core activities of the CAPS program. In particular, we will share our practices on recruitment process and mentor training program. Through a structured outreach, 12 CAPS scholars have been recruited (7 Hispanic and 6 female). Led by an educational psychologist who is also a Co-PI on the project, the training for faculty mentors focuses on increasing the awareness of growth mindset and developing a culturally responsive mentoring procedure. In Summer and Fall 18, group and individual mentoring sessions have taken place following the culturally responsive mentoring strategy. In addition to program activities, the paper will also share the data collected through scholar and faculty surveys and report the lessons learned during the first-year implementation.

Kang, E., & Dong, J., & Jackson, M. C., & Allen, E. L., & Lopez, G. (2019, June), Board 40: Developing a Culturally Adaptive Pathway to Success Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/32342

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