Asee peer logo

Board 60: Social Cognitive Impact of Industry internships upon Engineering Technology Students Developing Professional Identity: a Case Study

Download Paper |

Conference

2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 23, 2018

Start Date

June 23, 2018

End Date

July 27, 2018

Conference Session

College-Industry Partnerships Division Poster Session

Tagged Division

College Industry Partnerships

Page Count

11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/30070

Download Count

26

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Bobbi J. Spencer Texas State University

visit author page

B.J. Spencer, Ph.D., AIA

Dr. Spencer is a senior lecturer of architectural design courses and the internship coordinator in the Department of Engineering Technology at Texas State University. In 2017, she obtained her Ph.D. in Education from Texas State University with the emphasis on professional education. A registered Architect in the State of Texas, she received a Master of Architecture from Texas A&M University in 2007 where she participated in a study abroad semester at the Universita della Svizzera italiana, Accademia di Architettura di Mendrisio, Switzerland following 23 years of industry experience in architecture and construction.

Dr. Spencer’s research interests include:
Professional & International Education: architectural, construction
Experiential Education: study abroad, internships
Building information management
Technology in construction management
Education in online and virtual environments

visit author page

biography

Vedaraman Sriraman Texas State University

visit author page

Dr. Vedaraman Sriraman is a Piper Professor and University Distinguished Professor of Engineering Technology at Texas State University. He has served as the Associate Director of the LBJ Institute for STEM Education and Research at Texas State University. Dr. Sriraman's degrees are in Mechanical and Industrial engineering. His research interests are in engineering education, sustainability, and applied statistics. In the past, he has implemented several grants from the NSF, NASA and SME-EF. Dr. Sriraman has served as the faculty advisor to the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, the American Foundry Society and the Society of Women Engineers and as the Foundry Educational Foundation Key professor. He has also received several teaching awards at Texas State University. Currently, Dr. Sriraman serves as the Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs at Texas State University.

visit author page

biography

Kimberly Grau Talley P.E. Texas State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-6235-0706

visit author page

Dr. Kimberly G. Talley is an assistant professor in the Department of Engineering Technology, Maker Space Co-Director and Senior Research Fellow for the LBJ Institute for STEM Education and Research at Texas State University, and a licensed Professional Engineer. She received her Ph.D. and M.S.E. from the University of Texas at Austin in Structural Engineering. Her undergraduate degrees in History and in Construction Engineering and Management are from North Carolina State University. Dr. Talley teaches courses in the Construction Science and Management Program, and her research focus is in student engagement and retention in engineering and engineering technology education. Contact: talley@txstate.edu

visit author page

biography

Araceli Martinez Ortiz Texas State University

visit author page

Araceli Martinez Ortiz, PhD., is Research Associate Professor of Engineering Education in the College of Education at Texas State University. She leads a comprehensive research agenda related to issues of curriculum and instruction in engineering education, motivation and preparation of under-served populations of students and teachers and in assessing the impact of operationalizing culturally responsive teaching in the STEM classroom. As executive director of the LBJ Institute for STEM Education and Research, she collaborates on various state and national STEM education programs and is PI on major grant initiatives through NASA MUREP and NSF Improving Undergraduate STEM Education and NSF DUE . Araceli holds Engineering degrees from The University of Michigan and Kettering University. She holds a Masters degree in Education from Michigan State and a PhD in Engineering Education from Tufts University.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

The journey to acquiring professional identity begins in the academic preparation component of the community of practice. This acquisition is encouraged and promoted as student’s progress to graduation and transition into their professional career. In academia, thus, understanding and designing programs to enhance professional identity is vital to the successful placement of graduates into industry. This study will use Higgs’ [1] definition of professional identity as a person developing “the attitudes, beliefs and standards which support the practitioner role and the development of an identity as a member of the profession with a clear understanding of the responsibilities of being a… professional.” As students apply and intentionally pursue a degree in a specific discipline towards becoming a professional, they are acting as agents per Bandura’s [2] social cognitive theory of agency in their own future and make decisions according to their self-reflections, identified desires, and motivations. Academic experience alone does not provide the clarity and absorption of the professional nature of the discipline that would enable students to fully develop their professional identities as engineers. Therefore, immersion into the industry via early-staged internships contribute apprentice-type experiences, mentoring, and exposure to the professional culture that enables students to reflect upon, adjust their goals to, and enhance their current academic experience. This paper explores the development of three students’ professional identity during their internship experiences as a case study of industrial internships’ potential effects. The study is of the reflective writing assignments that are part of the internship requirements and were analyzed for emerging themes that were then connected to the associated literature. Key findings include the student’s reflections on active learning; mentoring - checks and balances, role models, professional socialization, and scaffolding; and professional identity - accountability, communication, knowledge base, and problem solving. The findings support the early internship model as it infuses vital professional attributes into their developing professional identity.

Spencer, B. J., & Sriraman, V., & Talley, K. G., & Ortiz, A. M. (2018, June), Board 60: Social Cognitive Impact of Industry internships upon Engineering Technology Students Developing Professional Identity: a Case Study Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/30070

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2018 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015