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Board # 70 : Comparing the Effectiveness of Semester-long vs. Accelerated-summer Course Offerings

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

Engineering Technology Division Poster Session

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Page Count

15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/27908

Download Count

100

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Paper Authors

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Ilse B. Nava Medina Texas A&M University

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Ilse earned her Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry at the Universidad de las Americas Puebla, Mexico. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering at Texas A&M University. During her doctoral study, she has been a graduate teaching assistant for General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry laboratories. She is also currently teaching the Metallic Materials (MMET 207) laboratory, as part of the Manufacturing & Mechanical Engineering Technology program within the Department of Engineering Technology & Industrial Distribution at Texas A&M University, discussed herein.

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Angie Hill Price Texas A&M University

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Dr. Angie Hill Price, Texas A&M University
Dr. Angie Hill Price is an associate professor in the Department of Engineering Technology & Industrial Distribution at Texas A&M University. She teaches courses in the areas of welding, quality assurance, and metallic materials. Dr. Price's research interests are in welding processes and troubleshooting, welding metallurgy, weld overlay systems, and engineering education. She received her B.S. degree in engineering technology (1987), M.S. in industrial engineering (1990), and Ph.D. (1999) degree in interdisciplinary engineering from Texas A&M University.

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Mathew Kuttolamadom Texas A&M University

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Dr. Mathew Abraham Kuttolamadom is an assistant professor in the Department of Engineering Technology & Industrial Distribution and the Department of Materials Science & Engineering at Texas A&M University. He received his Ph.D. in Materials Science & Engineering from Clemson University’s Int'l Center for Automotive Research. His professional experience is in the automotive industry including at the Ford Motor Company. At TAMU, he teaches Mechanics, Manufacturing and Mechanical Design to his students. His research thrusts include bioinspired functionally-graded composites, additive/subtractive manufacturing processes, laser surface texturing, tribology, visuo-haptic VR/AR interfaces and engineering education.

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Abstract

Many of the foundational courses in undergraduate engineering programs are essential pre-requisites for the core major-specific courses pertaining to the respective engineering degree, and hence typically have high enrollments. As a result, in addition to being offered during the regular semesters (Fall and Spring semesters, which are typically about 10 weeks in duration), many of these are also offered in an accelerated format over summer sessions (typically about 5 weeks in duration). Such a different manner of offering the same course over drastically different durations is expected to have dissimilar levels of effectiveness – this paper is thus a comparative inquiry into the same.

To compare the various aspects of effectiveness related to the difference in duration/format of course offerings, two sophomore-level foundational courses offered in the Manufacturing & Mechanical Engineering Technology (MMET) program within the Engineering Technology & Industrial Distribution (ETID) department at Texas A&M University (TAMU) were selected – these were two 200-level courses, one title “Metallic Materials” and the other “Mechanics for Technologists.” These were offered during the regular semesters as well as over summer sessions (5 weeks in duration), and each instructed by the same professors.

The evaluation mechanisms employed primarily involved comparing student performance in individual assignments as well the overall grades, comparative tracking of student performance as the course progressed, as well as in immediately succeeding courses, offering-specific comments in course/instructor evaluations as well as a survey meant to gauge student impressions. Altogether, the results tend to show that although students generally did not prefer an accelerated-format from a convenience standpoint, they in fact performed better in the accelerated format offerings, as well as in the immediately succeeding courses.

Nava Medina , I. B., & Price, A. H., & Kuttolamadom, M. (2017, June), Board # 70 : Comparing the Effectiveness of Semester-long vs. Accelerated-summer Course Offerings Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/27908

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2017 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015