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Build It And Will They Come? Refurbishing And Restoring An Ecet Curriculum

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Conference

2005 Annual Conference

Location

Portland, Oregon

Publication Date

June 12, 2005

Start Date

June 12, 2005

End Date

June 15, 2005

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Recruitment and Retention

Page Count

9

Page Numbers

10.278.1 - 10.278.9

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/15332

Download Count

25

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Paper Authors

author page

Tom Eppes

author page

Peter Schuyler

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1149

Build It and Will They Come? Refurbishing and Restoring an ECET Curriculum Professors Peter Schuyler and Tom Eppes University of Hartford

Abstract Since the 1990’s, nationwide enrollment in engineering technology programs has been declining. It has become increasing difficult to attract and retain students. A number of reasons have been attributed to this trend including; outdated curricula, loss of manufacturing jobs, off-shoring of jobs and a weak economy. As a result, competition to enroll students interested in these programs is fierce and has become crucial to maintain a viable and attractive curriculum.

The Electronics & Computer Engineering Technology (ECET) department at the University of Hartford is completing a major restructuring of its degree programs. We currently offer two Bachelor of Science programs: Electronic Engineering Technology (EET) and Computer Engineering Technology (CET). The restructuring was needed to improve student recruiting and better prepare graduates for industry. The full-time and adjunct faculties of the department with assistance from its industrial advisory board (IAB) worked collaboratively over the past year to develop and implement the changes to the curriculum

The restructuring was based on the conclusion that we needed to change both what was being taught and how it was being taught. Leading us was our mission that technology programs, by nature, must equip graduates with “hands-on” skills that make them immediately useful in entry- level positions in industry. In addition, our curricula must keep pace with the rapidly changing fields within electronics and computer technology. We believe the new curriculum and pedagogy will accomplish that.

The restructuring consisted of course deletions, significant course modifications and many new courses. In addition, course tracks were formed within each program. For EET, there are now two tracks: Mechatronics, Communications and Networks, and for CET Programming and Microprocessor tracks are included.

This paper describes the details of our curricula restructuring efforts and the key changes designed to improve marketability, retention, and pedagogy. Our goal is to revitalize the programs in electronics and computer engineering technology and reverse declining enrollments.

Brief Justification As the world of engineering and technology is an ever changing field, it is an ongoing challenge for higher education programs to keep pace with these changes. Since the 1990’s, nationwide enrollment in engineering technology programs has been declining and as a result it has become increasing difficult to attract and retain quality students. A number of reasons have been attributed to this trend including; outdated curricula, loss of manufacturing jobs, off-shoring of

“Proceedings of the 2005 American Society of Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2005 American Society of Engineering Education”

Eppes, T., & Schuyler, P. (2005, June), Build It And Will They Come? Refurbishing And Restoring An Ecet Curriculum Paper presented at 2005 Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon. https://peer.asee.org/15332

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