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Building A Modern Power Electronics And Electric Machines Laboratory

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Developments in the Energy Laboratories

Tagged Division

Energy Conversion and Conservation

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

12.329.1 - 12.329.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2222

Download Count

1135

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Paper Authors

biography

Ke Chen Cleveland State University

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Ke Chen received BS degree from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. He is currently a master student in Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Cleveland State University.

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biography

Ana Stankovic Cleveland State University

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Dr. Ana V. Stankovic received BS, MS and PhD degrees from the University of Belgrade, Serbia and University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is currently an Associate Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Cleveland State University. Her expertise is power electronics and electric machines and drives.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Building a Modern Power Electronics and Electric Machines Laboratory

Abstract This paper presents the development of the state of the art Power Electronics and Electric Machines Laboratory at Cleveland State University. This laboratory was designed as a part of newly developed power program that consists of three required courses in the undergraduate electrical engineering curriculum. Typically, Electromechanical Energy Conversion is the only one required power course in electrical engineering curriculum. To support the need of local industry in North East Ohio, two power courses, Power Electronics I and Electric Machines and Power Electronics Laboratory, have been added as required courses to undergraduate electrical engineering curriculum. With these changes, a new state of the art laboratory was designed and implemented, providing students with experiments related to all topics covered in two prerequisite courses, Electromechanical Energy Conversion and Power Electronics I.

The laboratory experiments represent the unique blend of traditional and contemporary approach to learning electric machines and power electronics. Modular Lab-Volt equipment has been used for experiments related to steady state analysis of Electric Machines and transformers. In addition, modern software and hardware technology (DSPACE) has been used for experiments related to real time control of different types of electric machines. In addition, several experiments related to power-pole approach and average models designed for power electronics converters have been adopted from the University of Minnesota and incorporated into the laboratory course material.

The new laboratory has been working flawlessly since its inception in fall of 2004. This paper describes the set of laboratory experiments, assessment method as well as the survey from students who took the laboratory course.

Introduction

In 2001, Power Electronics and Electric Machines program was fully developed in electrical and computer engineering department at Cleveland State University. To support newly developed curriculum, state of the art Power Electronics and Electric Machines Laboratory has been established. The old Electric Machines Laboratory that consisted of line-fed motor generator sets has been completely dismantled and replaced with seven modern test benches.

This paper presents the construction of the newly developed laboratory along with the structure of the Power Electronics and Electric Machines program. It has been shown in literature that number of power electronics and electric machines laboratories use either modular Lab-Volt equipment [1] or integrative approach [2], [3], [4], [5] and [6]. Unlike the majority of power electronics and electric machines laboratories that have recently been renovated, the laboratory at Cleveland State University has been designed to take the advantage of both traditional as well as contemporary approach to teaching power electronics and electric machines. To support this idea, several experiments have been developed with modular Lab-Volt equipment as well as DSPACE equipment and have been combined with experiments adopted from the University of

Chen, K., & Stankovic, A. (2007, June), Building A Modern Power Electronics And Electric Machines Laboratory Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/2222

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