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Building A Process For Establising An Integrated Design And Manufacturing Freshman Course

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Conference

2003 Annual Conference

Location

Nashville, Tennessee

Publication Date

June 22, 2003

Start Date

June 22, 2003

End Date

June 25, 2003

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Potpourri Design

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

8.275.1 - 8.275.13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/12218

Download Count

27

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Paper Authors

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Mark Thompson

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William Riffe

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Laura Rust

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Brenda Lemke

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B. Lee Tuttle

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Henry Kowalski

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Douglas Melton

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Lucy King

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Jacqueline El-Sayed

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 3425

Building a Process for Establishing an Interdisciplinary Design and Manufacturing Freshman Course Lucy Siu-Bik King, Ph.D., William Riffe, Ph.D., B. Lee Tuttle, Ph.D., Henry Kowalski, Ph.D., Brenda Lemke, M.S., Jacqueline El-Sayed, Ph.D., Douglas Melton, Ph.D., Laura Rust, Ph.D., Mark Thompson, Ph.D.

Kettering University, 1700 West Third Ave, Flint, MI 48504-4898 (810) 762-9500

Abstract

College freshmen, though they may be registered in the engineering programs, do not always know what discipline best suits their interests. Regardless of their future majors, current technological advancements and global competitions have created a necessary industrial atmosphere of interdisciplinary design and manufacturing in the product development cycle. An introductory course combining mechanical design, electronic control and manufacturing processes provides a totality in the perspective of engineering for the future. At the same time, the students’ views of engineering are broadened by the exposure to the different disciplines. As a result of the multi-discipline engineering exposure, they are in a better position to select a future career.

In this paper, the developmental process for establishing such a course is described. The process starts from the very top of the managerial pole. Potential departmental barriers are discussed and possible ways of quenching faculty and departmental traditional cultures are introduced. The structure for the lecture and laboratory sessions, the timing, the logistics of shuffling students from one area to the next are ironed out. Common times for lecture and labs are established. Students also work in teams to perform projects. Students are evaluated in the separate disciplinary areas as well as on a final integrated project where they are asked to combine aspects of mechanical design with electronic control and manufacturing processes. The assessment process will also be described. Fun objects are used in the laboratories, such as; battery operated mechanically animated pig, electronically controlled hexapod (“6-legged insect”), thermoformed Mickey Mouse, and machined pencil holder. Students’ comments included their excitement about learning the various aspects of engineering as well as being able to do hands-on designing, controlling and fabricating real products.

Introduction & Background

Current Engineering Freshmen already know about computers, internet, communication, satellites, cars, planes, missiles, weapons and much more. Given the exposure and the choices, it is very difficult for them to decide what discipline best suits their interests. They need to put their hands, literally, on devices from different fields. Regardless of their future majors, current technological advancements and global competitions have created a necessary industrial atmosphere of interdisciplinary design and manufacturing in the product development cycle. An

“Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2003, American Society for Engineering Education

Thompson, M., & Riffe, W., & Rust, L., & Lemke, B., & Tuttle, B. L., & Kowalski, H., & Melton, D., & King, L., & El-Sayed, J. (2003, June), Building A Process For Establising An Integrated Design And Manufacturing Freshman Course Paper presented at 2003 Annual Conference, Nashville, Tennessee. https://peer.asee.org/12218

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