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Building Global Infrastructure for Diversity and Inclusion in Engineering Education

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Conference

2016 ASEE International Forum

Location

New Orleans, Louisiana

Publication Date

June 25, 2016

Start Date

June 25, 2016

End Date

June 25, 2016

Conference Session

Concurrent Paper Tracks Session II Skills Development

Tagged Topics

Diversity and International Forum

Page Count

10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/27237

Download Count

42

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Paper Authors

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Autumn Marie Reed University of Maryland, Baltimore County

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​Dr. Reed coordinates campus-wide initiatives designed to enhance and support faculty diversity at UMBC. Working collaboratively with the Leadership Team in the Office of the Provost, the Deans, and Faculty Leaders from the Executive Committee on the Recruitment, Retention, and Advancement of URM Faculty, the ADVANCE Executive Committee, the STRIDE Committee, and the faculty leaders of UMBC’s Community-Based Faculty Groups, Dr. Reed develops, implements, and evaluates programmatic interventions designed to recruit, retain and advance diverse faculty at UMBC. Dr. Reed also routinely disseminates best practices learned from UMBC’s diversity initiatives at national and international venues. Dr. Reed is on the advisory board for the Mid-Atlantic Higher Education Recruitment Consortium.​

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Renetta G. Tull University of Maryland, Baltimore County

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Renetta Garrison Tull is Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Student Professional Development & Postdoctoral Affairs at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC: An Honors University in Maryland), where she is the Co-PI and Founding Director for the National Science Foundation’s PROMISE: Maryland’s Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP) for the 12 institutions in the University System of Maryland, and Co-PI Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) Bridge to the Doctorate at UMBC. Dr. Tull has worked with thousands of students from Alaska to Puerto Rico, and in Latin America through graduate school preparation workshops that have been sponsored by AGEP, The National GEM Consortium, National Society of Black Engineers, Society for Hispanic Professional Engineers, Society for the Advancement of Chicano, and Native American Scientists, American Indian Science and Engineering Society, and the Alliance/Merck Ciencia Hispanic Scholars Program. She has presented workshops on graduate school admissions, “The Success Equation,” STEM initiatives, and PhD Completion in Panama, Mexico, Ecuador, Colombia, Puerto Rico, and schools around the United States. Tull is on the board of advisors for the PNW-COSMOS Alliance to increase the number of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) students who complete STEM graduate programs, and is a speaker on “GRADLab” tour with the National GEM Consortium, giving talks across the US on Saturday mornings during the Fall. Tull researched speech technology as former member of the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has co-authored several publications on achievement in STEM fields, and is a mentoring consultant for Purdue, Carnegie Mellon, Cornell, MIT, and other schools. She co-leads the “ADVANCE Hispanic Women in STEM” project in Puerto Rico, and the Latin and Caribbean Consortium of Engineering Institutions’ (LACCEI) “Women in STEM” forum. Tull was a finalist for the 2015 Global Engineering Deans Council/Airbus Diversity Award, and has presented on diversity in the US, Latin America, Europe, Australia, India. She is a Tau Beta Pi “Eminent Engineer.”

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David A. Delaine Universidade de São Paulo

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David A. Delaine is a progressive engineer who has strong interests in the intersections of engineering, education, and society. He has obtained a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Drexel University, in Philadelphia, USA. He is currently serving his second term as an executive member of the International Federation of Engineering Education Societies (IFEES). In this role he serves as a Vice President, representing Diversity and Inclusion. He is currently performing research as a Fulbright Scholar postdoctoral researcher at the Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo for his project titled "An Action Research of Boundary Spanning Intervention on University-wide STEM Educational Engagement" where he will attempt to optimize community/university relations for broadening participation in the STEM fields. David is a co-founder and past president of the Student Platform for Engineering Education Development (SPEED). He has ambitions to significantly broaden the global pipeline of STEM talent and to unify the needs of the engineering education stakeholders in order for engineering education to more accurately reflect societal needs. Diversity and inclusion, university/community engagement, educational research methods, action research, and student led initiatives fall within the scope of his growing expertise.

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Darryl N Williams Tufts University

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Rovani Sigamoney UNESCO

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Rovani Sigamoney is a chemical/environmental engineer from South Africa who started in the platinum refinery/mining sector and then moved on to researching bioenergy systems and biofuels for Africa.

She joined the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) HQ in Paris, France in 2007 and later ran the Chemistry programme and International Year of Chemistry 2011 and thereafter the Engineering programme. The Engineering Programme is working with countries, international partners and program experts to strengthen engineering education through curricula development, hands-on training and capacity building. In line with UNESCO’s global priorities on Africa and Gender Equality, it focuses on women and Africa. Rovani is passionate about women in engineering and encouraging more youth to pursue careers in engineering.

She previously worked at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Paris on a biofuels strategy and also at the Wuppertal Institute of Climate Change in Germany on a policy document for the European Parliament on the security of energy supply.

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Abstract

In the 21st century, the global knowledge economy faces numerous challenges, which can only be surmounted through the full participation and equal regard of all diverse talents. In engineering education this broadening of participation is of paramount importance, as this field grapples first-hand with how to effectively address many of these global problems. Unfortunately, engineering education suffers from a lack of diversity due to gendered, ethno-racial, and cultural barriers, often implicit, that circumvent the full inclusion of members from underrepresented groups. This lack of diversity threatens to impede engineering’s ability to tackle these pressing societal issues. As such, the field of engineering is at a critical crossroads, at which it is imperative that thought-leaders from multiple nations across academia, industry, and the government, come together to initialize a global scale collaborative effort to diversify the field. This paper describes one such diversity effort that took place at the 2015 World Engineering Education Forum (WEEF) in Florence, Italy, that resulted from prior meetings and conversations at the 2014 WEEF meeting in Dubai, UAE, and the 2015 ASEE meeting with UNESCO in Seattle, WA, USA, which in concert expand on the International Federation of Engineering Education Societies’ (IFEES) increased emphasis on inclusion. This new effort, the September 2015 WEEF special session: “Diversity & Inclusion in Global Engineering Education Education- Initializing Global Scale Collaboration,” was designed to educate and spur an international audience of leaders to collective action toward fostering practices to diversify engineering. This paper, in two interrelated sections, 1) reviews the educational component and 2) the resulting outcomes and recommendations of this session. The first section, summarizes the framing of the issue through literature and data on diversity and inclusion, followed by a description of the training on explicit and implicit biases at the session. This section also includes results from an interactive exercise in which audience member’s anonymously reported their experiences with biases in engineering and articulated the tools they need to cultivate diversity among their students and colleagues. Participants included engineering deans and corporate CEOs from Nigeria, Turkey, South Africa, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, the United States, and other countries. Section two is action-oriented and builds upon the educational awareness and session participants’ personal experiences as outlined in section one. This second section describes the use of Structure-Behavior-Function (SBF), an approach from systems engineering, and other best practices, as empowering tools leaders can implement to broach the subject of diversity, and foster actions that lead to respect, appreciation, equity, and inclusion of individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds within their respectives countries. As a continuation of conversations from the special session at WEEF in Italy, this paper offers recommendations that can assist global stakeholders in countries outside of the U.S. to develop locally supportive climates for people from all backgrounds (students, faculty, and staff) who seek and share engineering education. Further, faculty within the U.S. can use these recommendations as they train their students to be culturally-competent, and globally-relevant engineers.

Reed, A. M., & Tull, R. G., & Delaine, D. A., & Williams, D. N., & Sigamoney, R. (2016, June), Building Global Infrastructure for Diversity and Inclusion in Engineering Education Paper presented at 2016 ASEE International Forum, New Orleans, Louisiana. https://peer.asee.org/27237

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