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Building STEAM for Global Engineering through Collaboration with the Social Sciences and Humanities during the COVID-19 Pandemic

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Multidisciplinary Learning and Teaching Experiences

Tagged Division

Multidisciplinary Engineering

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

13

DOI

10.18260/1-2--36772

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/36772

Download Count

146

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Paper Authors

biography

Ann-Perry Witmer P.E. University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-7210-9572

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A research scientist, lecturer, and professional civil engineer, Ann-Perry Witmer is the architect of the emerging discipline of Contextual Engineering, which merges technical design with societal understanding to improve adoption outcomes. Dr. Witmer brings to the classroom her experience working as an engineering consultant in the United States and a volunteer on numerous drinking water projects with communities throughout the non-industrialized world. She holds a Ph.D. in Contextual Engineering, along with MS and BS degrees in civil/environmental engineering, as well as bachelor's degrees in journalism and art history. Her research group investigates the relevance and application of context to engineering and entrepreneurial processes both domestically and internationally.

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José G. Andino Martínez University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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José is a native of El Salvador, where he initiated studies of Chemistry at the University of El Salvador in 1992 and has been involved with chemistry all his life. He holds a PhD from the University of Louisville under supervision of Prof. Dorothy Gibson in 2005. His thesis work focused on the organometallic chemistry and electrocatalytic reduction of CO2. During his postdoctoral work at Indiana University he continued to focus on small molecule activation using molecular modeling methods under supervision of professors, Baik, Caulton and Mindiola. José started his teaching career at Lamar University in 2012 and has been part of the teaching faculty at the University of Illinois since 2014. At Illinois, José has a deep interest in interdisciplinary projects, including study abroad courses and more recently with the Illinois Global Institute.

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Olivia C. Coiado University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Dr. Olivia C Coiado
Teaching Assistant Professor, Medical Education Facilitator
Course Director, Discovery Learning Program
Affiliate Professor, Bioengineering
Olivia Coiado has a Postdoctoral training from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2013-2015) where she developed a new technology for cardiac therapy. She received her B.S degree in medical physics in 2005 from the University of São Paulo, Brazil, M.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Campinas, Brazil (2008) and Doctorate degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Campinas, Brazil (2012). She has published journal articles describing a new technology to pace the heart using ultrasonic pulses and medical/engineering education research. Prof. Coiado is passionate about everything that involves education, innovation and technology. At Carle Illinois College of Medicine, she serves as a medical educator facilitator as part of the Academic Affairs Committee responsible for developing the innovative Carle Illinois curriculum and the Course director for Discovery Learning.

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Jessica Marie Mingee University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Jessica Mingee is a junior pursuing a major in Mechanical Engineering and a minor in Sustainability, Energy, and Environment at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is a project lead within Engineers Without Borders, working with the community of Hopkins Park, Illinois to repair their wastewater system. Based on her interest in understanding how engineers gain the trust of their client communities, her research focuses on community organizing techniques and how engineers can utilize them to be more effective in their infrastructure interventions.

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Flavia Andrade University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-3856-3816

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Flavia Andrade is an Associate Professor at the School of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She also holds appointments in the departments of Sociology and Kinesiology and Community Health. She is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America. She is the acting director of the Women and Gender in Global Perspectives program. Her research focuses on the health of older women and men in Latin America and the Caribbean, particularly Brazil and Mexico, and Latinos in the United States.

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Tim Pollack-Lagushenko University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign

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Tim Pollack holds a PhD in history from Johns Hopkins University and currently works for the Center for Global Studies at UIUC, one of the National Research Centers (NRCs) that make up the Illinois Global Institute (IGI).

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Abstract

The relevance of global conditions to technical design can be a challenging pedagogy for engineering faculty to present, particularly when rigorous engineering curricula leave little room for more than the most cursory examinations of the relationship of global trends, societal interactions, economic drivers, and racial/ethnic identities to the design process. While interdisciplinary learning is encouraged by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) for engineering education programs, the reality is that engineering curricula often marginalize the social sciences and humanities as irrelevant to engineering practice and decision-making. A multidisciplinary team of engineering, history, medicine, social work, chemistry, and global studies faculty at the University of Illinois has formed to encourage cross-discipline dialogue among scholars, students, and practitioners to better situate science and technology in a societal context. The Global STEAM group was founded amid the COVID-19 pandemic in Spring 2020 and, with the sponsorship of the Illinois Global Institute and Applied Research Institute, launched its first campus-wide forum in September with a three-event series, entitled Global STEAM in An Age of Uncertainty. From the discussion around how COVID-19 impacted the age of uncertainty, the group created three roundtable events. The forum featured scholars from around the world exploring the topics of “The Uneasy Relationship Between Science and Politics,” “The Conflict Between Science and Compassion,” and “Science and the Global in a Brave New World.” In its short active life, the Global STEAM group already has generated considerable interest among both faculty and students across the diverse campus and opened opportunities for engineering students to conduct research and attend courses taught by non-technical faculty who recognize the intersectional value of situating technical thought in a global context. In addition to planning future interdisciplinary events, the working group is exploring the establishment of permanent programming to unite the social and physical sciences and humanities to produce globally minded technical experts who are equipped to function effectively and sensitively in a rapidly changing and diverse international environment. Continued evidence of impact will consist of increased faculty participation, creation of interdisciplinary courses, and facilitation of well-attended events that engage both the physical sciences and the social sciences/humanities.

Witmer, A., & Andino Martínez, J. G., & Coiado, O. C., & Mingee, J. M., & Andrade, F., & Pollack-Lagushenko, T. (2021, July), Building STEAM for Global Engineering through Collaboration with the Social Sciences and Humanities during the COVID-19 Pandemic Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. 10.18260/1-2--36772

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