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Building Undergraduate Me Student Design Portfolio: Case Study On Heat And Mass Transfer Project

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Conference

2001 Annual Conference

Location

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Publication Date

June 24, 2001

Start Date

June 24, 2001

End Date

June 27, 2001

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

6.255.1 - 6.255.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/8975

Download Count

62

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Paper Authors

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X. Qian

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A. Jalloh

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Zheng-Tao Deng

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Amir Mobasher

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Ruben Rojas-Oviedo

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1566

Building Undergraduate ME Student Design Portfolio: Case study on Heat and Mass Transfer Project

Z.T. Deng, Ruben Rojas-Oviedo, X. Qian, A. Jalloh and A. Mobasher

Department of Mechanical Engineering Alabama A&M University Normal, AL 35762 Phone: (256) 858-4142 E-Mail: aamzxd01@aamu.edu rojaso@aamu.edu; cqian@aamu.edu; ajalloh@aamu.edu; amobasher@aamu.edu

Abstract

One of the key challenges to engineering educator today is how to provide a fast track to project and design engineering while providing the strong fundamental engineering education and solid preparation in engineering analysis and design in a four-year program. It is critical to build the skills necessary for engineering graduates to better meet industry’s expectations and have successful careers.

The faculty of the Mechanical Engineering (ME) department at Alabama A&M University adopted a system approach, denoted by the acronym SEAARK, for instruction and teaching. SEAARK stands for (in reverse order) Knowledge, Repetition, Application, Analysis, Evaluation and Synthesis. It covers the learning from the basic to the complex levels. The SEAARK approach for lectures is also utilized for class projects. The ME program strongly encourage teamwork on a class project for courses in the major. This allows students to develop a design portfolio starting from the freshman year. Project training continues through their capstone design course. The projects assigned to students are often combined with on-going faculty externally funded research projects.

The faculty of the Mechanical Engineering department is currently conducting research on “investigation of energy conservation in residential hot water distribution systems” funded by Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Lab. The objective of the project is (1) to perform a feasibility analysis of the technique or devices that can improve delivery efficiency of hot water distribution system, (2) to develop simulation model to variable hot water delivery methods and (3) to perform laboratory tests of hot water distribution conservation techniques/devices.

This research contract provides design and analysis student projects to several mechanical engineering courses, such as Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, Heat and Mass Transfer, Computer Programming, Automatic Controls, and the mechanical engineering senior design course. Proceedings of the 2001American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2001, American Society for Engineering Education

Qian, X., & Jalloh, A., & Deng, Z., & Mobasher, A., & Rojas-Oviedo, R. (2001, June), Building Undergraduate Me Student Design Portfolio: Case Study On Heat And Mass Transfer Project Paper presented at 2001 Annual Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico. https://peer.asee.org/8975

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