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Capstone Courses For Engineering Technology Students

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Student Learning Techniques & Practices in Engineering Technology

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

13.274.1 - 13.274.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3174

Download Count

31

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Paper Authors

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Vladimir Genis Drexel University

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Dr. Vladimir Genis, Associate Professor and Program Director of Applied Engineering Technology in the Goodwin College, Drexel University, taught and developed graduate and undergraduate courses in physics, electronics, nondestructive testing, biomedical engineering, and acoustics. His research interests include ultrasound wave propagation and scattering, ultrasound imaging, nondestructive testing, electronic instrumentation, piezoelectric transducers, and engineering education. He serves as a member of the Drexel’s Faculty Senate.

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Warren Rosen Drexel University

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Dr. Warren Rosen received his Ph.D. in physics from Temple University in 1978. From 1979 to 1985 he served as assistant professor of physics at Vassar and Colby Colleges where he carried out research in optical physics, solar physics, and medical physics. From 1985 to 1996 he worked at the Naval Air Warfare Center in Warminster, PA in the area of optical communications. In 1996 Dr. Rosen was appointed research professor of electrical and computer engineering at Drexel University and he joined the staff of Drexel’s Goodwin College of Professional Studies in 2007. He is the author or coauthor of over 50 publications and conference proceedings and the holder of four U.S. patents in computer networking and signal processing.

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Richard Chiou Drexel University

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Dr. Richard Chiou is currently Associate Professor of Applied Engineering Technology at Drexel University in Philadelphia. Dr. Chiou received his Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology in 1995. His areas of education and research emphasis include mechatronics, Internet based robotics and automation, and remote sensors and monitoring. Dr. Chiou incorporates real-world problems into his research and teaching. He has secured many research and education grants from the NSF, the DoED, the SME Education Foundation, and industries.

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William Danley Drexel University

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Dr. William Danley, Senior Lecturer of Applied Engineering Technology in the Goodwin College, Drexel University, taught and developed undergraduates courses in thermodynamics, thermal system design, fluid mechanics, thermal, pneumatics and hydraulics laboratories, materials engineering, analytical chemistry and engineering economics. Prior to returning to academia, he worked in industry for a number of Fortune 500 companies and was granted four patents relating to spectrometers and electrochemical sensors used in industrial control.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Capstone Courses for Applied Engineering Technology Students

Abstract

Drexel University’s Goodwin College of Professional Studies has offered a co-op-based Applied Engineering Technology (AET) major since 2002. The program comprises three concentrations in Electrical, Mechanical, and Industrial Engineering Technology and provides an integrated educational experience directed toward developing the ability to apply the knowledge gained in the college to the solution of practical problems in the engineering technology field. The majority of courses are fully integrated with training and laboratory experience to provide students with a strong foundation of engineering practices and to stimulate students’ interest by using a problem solving approach in state-of- the-art laboratories. Key factors in the development process included creation of the educational laboratories that can significantly contribute to the development of technologically literate students and workforce that could be in great demand not only in the tri-state area but also nationwide. Several laboratory- and project-based courses were developed and four of them, such as Nondestructive Evaluation of Materials, Programmable Logic Controllers, Measurements, and Robotics and Mechatronics, are described in this paper.

1. Introduction

The Applied Engineering Technology (AET) program at Drexel University was initiated as a response to job- and education-related issues expressed by government, academic institutions and industries across the nation. Since fall of 2002, Drexel has been offering its AET major in collaboration with the Delaware County Community College (DCCC) under a dual model, in which the students can pursue both AAS and BS degrees concurrently at DCCC facilities. In fall 2004, the AET major became available to the students at Drexel who intend to pursue the BS degree on a full- and part-time basis. The AET program’s content provides an integrated educational experience directed toward developing the ability to apply the fundamental knowledge gained in Drexel’s Goodwin College to the solution of practical problems in the engineering technology fields. The AET program clearly distinguishes itself from traditional engineering programs by applying a hands-on approach to the delivery of the courses. Over the past three years several state-of-the-art laboratories were developed. A key factor in this process is the creation of the educational laboratories that can significantly contribute to the development of technologically literate students and workforce that could be in great demand not only in the tri-state area but also nationwide.1,2 The establishment of the state-of-the-art laboratories allows Drexel and its community college partners to develop training options for engineering technologists located in the region’s key industries. Four capstone courses are described in this paper.

These courses complement the Senior Design Project capstone three-term, nine credit sequence and encourage students to apply their previous knowledge and experience in solving real-world engineering problems and develop skills in making professional presentations and writing technical reports. Experience gained by students during the laboratory sessions is often applied in their senior design projects and during their co-op cycles. For example, currently one of the senior design project teams is developing an automated thermocouple welder. Experience obtained by students in the Robotics and Mechatronics and Programmable Logic Controllers courses is being utilized during this senior design project. Another senior design project team is applying the knowledge and experience in ultrasound nondestructive testing (NDT) and robotics to develop an automatic scanning system for NDT applications. The newly developed courses “Energy Conversion” and “Microcontrollers” will follow the described model.

1

Genis, V., & Rosen, W., & Chiou, R., & Danley, W. (2008, June), Capstone Courses For Engineering Technology Students Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/3174

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