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Case-Based Instruction for Innovation Education in Engineering and Technology

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Collection

2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Indianapolis, Indiana

Publication Date

June 15, 2014

Start Date

June 15, 2014

End Date

June 18, 2014

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Entrepreneurship & Engineering Innovation Division New Ideas Session 1

Tagged Division

Entrepreneurship & Engineering Innovation

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

24.264.1 - 24.264.13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/20155

Download Count

78

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Paper Authors

biography

Christy L. Bozic Purdue University

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Christy Bozic is the Director of Workforce and STEM Education for the College of Technology at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. In this role, she leads interdisciplinary workforce education initiatives for the Indiana Next Generation Manufacturing Competitiveness Center. She has worked in university engagement and technology transfer for the Purdue Technical Assistance Program and Purdue College of Technology Statewide. Prior to joining Purdue, Bozic has been a small business owner and has held positions in sales engineering, global business management, and operations management. Bozic holds degrees from Purdue University (BS Industrial Technology), Butler University (MBA Marketing), and will complete her PhD in Curriculum and Instruction from Purdue University in May 2014.

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Nathan W. Hartman Purdue University, West Lafayette

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Nathan Hartman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Graphics Technology at Purdue University, and Director of the Purdue University PLM Center of Excellence. Dr. Hartman is also Director of Advanced Manufacturing in the College of Technology. His research focuses on examining the use of 3D CAD tools in the product lifecycle, the process and methodology for model-based definition and the model-based enterprise, geometry automation, and data interoperability and re-use. He currently teaches courses in 3D modeling, virtual collaboration, 3D data interoperability, and graphics standards and data exchange. Professor Hartman also leads a team in the development and delivery of the online Purdue PLM Certificate Program and in the development of the next-generation manufacturing curriculum at Purdue focusing on manufacturing systems and the holistic product lifecycle.

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Abstract

Case-based Instruction for Innovation Education in EngineeringThe need for the integration of relevant curriculum focused on innovation theory and themanagement of innovation within engineering education has been a topic of ongoing discussionat the national level. The Council of Competitiveness suggests STEM graduates will be the keyto innovation growth, although the number of engineers entering the field is not sufficient toreplace retiring professionals. Today’s global economy requires engineers and technologists totake the lead role in innovation and idea generation, although innovation is not a topic that istypically included in the undergraduate curriculum.One approach to teaching innovation theory is case-based instruction. Case studies are effectivein engineering education because they bridge the gap between theory and practice. Students alsoreport being more engaged in coursework when case studies are included in the curriculum.Although effective, case analysis is not as prevalent in the classroom as the more traditionallecture-based instructional methods.This paper explores student attitude toward the use of case studies in engineering education. Thedata is drawn from the results of a mixed-methods study of engineering technology students whoparticipated in a case study discussion of disruptive innovation theory. An assessment of studentattitude toward the use of the innovation case study was given to a sample of 90 engineeringtechnology students. Qualitative results from this instrument will be presented in this paper.This research is intended to provide insight into student perception and acceptance of the use ofcases in the engineering and technology classroom. This phenomenological research willexamine students’ personal views of their attitudes. Research will be supported by thick, richdescription drawn from students’ own words to gain further insight into student perception ofboth innovation education and case-based instruction.

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2014 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015