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Cell Di-Electrorotation: Studying of Rotation to Characterize Biological Cells and the Connections in Engineering to the Next Generation Standards

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Conference

2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Atlanta, Georgia

Publication Date

June 23, 2013

Start Date

June 23, 2013

End Date

June 26, 2013

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees' Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

23.277.1 - 23.277.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/19291

Download Count

24

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Paper Authors

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Shawn H Maison Central Michigan University and Bangor Township Schools

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Mr. Maison is a high school STEM teacher in Biology, Biotechnology and Anatomy. He also teaches as a Geology, Biology, and Environmental instructor at the collegiate level. He has always been passionate about the natural sciences. Mr. Maison believes that understanding ourselves and the world within and around us is what will drive us as a society. It is also what motivates him as a teacher. He finds true value in science, technology, engineering, and math disciplines and believes those disciplines are the tools our youth desperately need to become successful leaders in the world today. Mr. Maison enjoys helping students realize their biological passion and niche in science. His experiences fuel his desire to continue to learn and teach.

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Adam J. P. Bauer CMU

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Mr. Bauer is currently in the graduate Chemistry program at Central Michigan University and is doing research with Dr. Bingbing Li. His undergraduate degree from Alma College was in Biochemistry.

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Steven Shapardanis Central Michigan University

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Thomas Stuart White

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Ze Zhang

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Bingbing Li Department of Chemistry, Science of Advanced Materials Doctoral Program, Central Michigan University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-6140-4189

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Qin Hu Central Michigan University

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Dr. Qin Hu received her B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering from University of Electronic Science and Technology of China in Chengdu, China, and received her Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Old Dominion University in Norfolk, in 2004. She was a post-doctoral research fellow at Old Dominion University from 2004 to 2007. In 2007, she joined Central Michigan University as assistant professor of Electrical Engineering. She teaches in the area of microelectronic circuits, microprocessor, probability, statistics and random process in engineering. Her main research interests have been in the area of numerical bioelectromagnetics, semiconductor devices modeling & simulation, electrical properties of materials, therapeutic applications of electromagnetic fields, and software engineering and development. She has authored/co-authored 26 journal papers and several conference papers published in prestigious, international, peer-reviewed journals. She is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), a member of the Biophysical Society (BPS) and a member of the Society of Woman Engineers (SWE).

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Tolga Kaya Central Michigan University

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Dr. Tolga Kaya currently holds a joint assistant professor position in the School of Engineering and Technology and the Science of Advanced Materials program at Central Michigan University (CMU). Prior to joining CMU, From 2007 to 2010, Dr. Kaya was a post-doctorate associate at Yale University. From 1999 to 2007, he was a research and teaching assistant at Istanbul Technical University. In 2007 he became a consultant at Brightwell Corp. He was a senior VLSI analog design engineer and project coordinator at Microelectronics R&D Company from 2000 to 2006, and a visiting assistant in research at Yale University from 2004 to 2005. Dr. Kaya received B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electronics Engineering from Istanbul Technical University in Istanbul, Turkey.
His research interests in electrical engineering and applied sciences are analog VLSI circuit design, MEMS sensors and energy harvesting systems. His research is also involved in biomedical engineering where bacterial hydrodynamics are studied under various shear flow regimes to enlighten the bacterial infections in catheterized patients. He is also working in engineering education research.

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Abstract

Cell Di-Electrorotation: Studying of Rotation to Characterize Biological Cells and the Connections in Engineering to the Next Generation StandardsBiological engineering is a field that most secondary educator will never gain researchexperience in. With new engineering standards playing a predominant role in the new “NextGeneration Science Standards” teachers and students will be struggling for meaningful lessonplans that teach engineering standards. Students will need leaders (teachers) that have anengineering knowledge base to properly learn true engineering practice. Teachers will need realengineering experiences to be proficient enough to help students learn true engineering conceptsand standards. That is what the RET (Research Experiences for Teachers) has provided.By creating a di-electrophoresis chamber, cell frequency can be observed. This would allow theidentification of healthy cells from diseased cells. Theoretically, one method of identifying cellsis by the frequency of their rotation within a di-electrical field. By layering one electric field ontop of another in a sealed chamber cells can be trapped within a di-electric field in solution. TheRET (NSF project) has given each teacher the tools needed to aide students in the newengineering standards. The Di-electrophoresis project required collaboration between threedepartments on campus. The biology, chemistry, and engineering departments all collaboratedon the di-electrophoresis project. Each department played a critical role in combining resourcesto fabricate a device that could potential trap cells in an electrical chip. This collaboration iswhat allowed the engineering and technology end to create the di-electrophoresis device. Theparameters were set by the cell size. The cells were removed from sub-culture usingbiochemistry laboratories and staff. Resources in the engineering and technology departmentwere used to fabricate the device. The correct electrical field was designed by an electricalengineer. The resources and collaboration between disciplines is the core of what engineering is.In this experience teachers learned to use their strengths, but also know when to rely on otherswith more experience in different disciplines. As a result of this project we have gained anunderstanding that failure is a teaching point and that each prototype created is a success nomatter what the outcome is. Showing students that engineering is fluid and always changing,improving, and evolving. Redesigning current labs to have outcomes that can vary from studentto student is one way we have already been able to adjust current curriculum to meet the newstandards in engineering. Many sciences have designated designed outcomes in their labs, andexpected results in their directed lessons or projects. Allowing students to design their own labsinstead of us giving rigid outlines in experiments or projects is becoming a paradigm shiftalready in how our labs are being taught at both the secondary and collegiate settings. Ourstudents are more engaged in collaborating and group work as a result of this RET project. Wewill provide detailed project description and resulting classroom activities that were developed asa result of the RET project.

Maison, S. H., & Bauer, A. J. P., & Shapardanis, S., & White, T. S., & Zhang, Z., & Li, B., & Hu, Q., & Kaya, T. (2013, June), Cell Di-Electrorotation: Studying of Rotation to Characterize Biological Cells and the Connections in Engineering to the Next Generation Standards Paper presented at 2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Atlanta, Georgia. https://peer.asee.org/19291

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