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Challenges And Benefits Of Running A Multi Institutional Recruitment

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Collection

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

At The Institutional Level

Tagged Division

Women in Engineering

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

13.283.1 - 13.283.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3798

Download Count

49

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Paper Authors

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Judy Loveless-Morris University of Washington

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Judy Loveless-Morris is a graduate student in the Department of Sociology at the University of Washignton. Her resarch interests include: stratification; race and ethnicity; sociology of work; inequality in work organizations; and qualitative research methods. She is also a research assistant at the Center for Workforce Development, University of Washington.

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Priti Mody-Pan

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Priti Mody is Director of New & International Initiatives at the University of Washington Center for Workforce Development and lead evaluator of NW-ETEP.

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Robert Embrey Highline Community College

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Robert Embrey is the Project Manager for the
NW Engineering Talent Expansion Partnership at Highline Community College.

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Kali Kuwada Seattle Central Community College

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Kali Kuwada is a Counselor for engineering at Seattle Central Community College.

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Marisela Mendoza Columbia Basin College

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Marisela Mendoza is the NW Engineering Talent Expansion Site Coordinator at Columbia Basin College.

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Robert Olsen Washington State University

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Dr. Robert Olsen is the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs and Student Services and Boeing Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering within the College of Engineering and Architecture at Washington State University. He is a principal investigator of this National Science Foundation grant.

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Eve Riskin University of Washington

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Dr. Eve Riskin is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of, Electrical Engineering in the University of Washington College of Engineering. She is a principal investigator of this National Science Foundation grant.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Challenges and Benefits of Running a Multi-institutional Recruitment and Retention Engineering Program

I. Introduction

Low enrollment of underrepresented minority (URM) and female students in engineering is of national concern. In 2002, six colleges at the four year and community college level, along with several other key institutions collaborated to form the Northwest Engineering Talent Expansion Partnership (NW-ETEP). The main goal of the project is to increase the number of URMs and females who earn undergraduate engineering degrees, but it also provides a unique opportunity to discuss the challenges and benefits of multi-institutional research. Collaborative research and evaluation is becoming common practice amongst those interested in the underrepresentation of URMs in science and engineering 1. While the concept and benefits of coalitions are well accepted, the challenges of multi-institutional analysis are often undiscussed 3. This exploratory paper will discuss the challenges and rewards of participating in a multi-institutional collaboration.

The findings from this paper will add to the scant literature focusing on the challenges of multi- institutional collaborations. Moreover, this paper specifically addresses the challenges of collaborative efforts for those interested in recruitment, retention, and assessment. Since multi- institutional research and evaluation are becoming frequent, it is important to address this gap in the literature as well as provide a model and guidance for future collaborative efforts.

Coalitions are touted as best practice when it comes to redesigning how engineering education is delivered, especially to diverse student populations1. Among the benefits of multi-institutional efforts are the opportunities to synthesize knowledge, resources, and efforts for a common goal 1, 3, 6, 8, 10 . Coalitions have had many successes, but also present some difficulties. The literature, including a typology of collaborations is reviewed in more detail in the “Findings” section below.

NW-ETEP collaborations yielded the similar obstacles identified within the literature: dissemination, geographical challenges, and the demand of additional responsibilities 1, 3, 6, 8, 10. Even though the challenges were similar, the extent is not as pervasive as previous findings. Because of study limitations, such as numbers of participants and location, our findings are not generalizable. However, our study replicates the same difficulties that other studies have found, suggesting that our findings have some merit and may provide conditions that will alleviate the challenges of multi-institutional collaborations.

One of the significant contributions of this paper is how adapting relationship styles can reduce dissemination challenges 8. Another feature of this paper is to extend our understanding of the difficulties of geographical diversity, as well as suggest how geographical distances can be closed through structured communication. The challenges of additional duties are discussed, but suggestions for future research are made. Lastly, this paper adds to the literature of collaborative research by exploring some of the challenges of the evaluation research in a collaborative environment.

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2008 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015