Asee peer logo

Characterizing and Addressing Student Learning Issues and Misconceptions (SLIM) with Muddiest Point Reflections and Fast Formative Feedback

Download Paper |

Conference

2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Indianapolis, Indiana

Publication Date

June 15, 2014

Start Date

June 15, 2014

End Date

June 18, 2014

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Materials Division Technical Session 1

Tagged Division

Materials

Page Count

18

Page Numbers

24.273.1 - 24.273.18

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/20164

Download Count

37

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Stephen J. Krause Arizona State University

visit author page

Stephen J. Krause is professor in the Materials Program in the Fulton School of Engineering at Arizona State University. He teaches in the areas of bridging engineering and education, capstone design, and introductory materials science and engineering. His research interests include strategies for web-based teaching and learning, misconceptions and their repair, and role of formative feedback on conceptual change. He has co-developed a Materials Concept Inventory for assessing conceptual knowledge of students in introductory materials engineering classes. He is currently conducting research on web-based tools for teaching and learning, misconceptions and strategies and tools to promote conceptual change in materials courses.

visit author page

author page

Dale R Baker Arizona State University

biography

Adam R Carberry Arizona State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-0041-7060

visit author page

Adam R. Carberry, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor at Arizona State University in the Fulton Schools of Engineering. He earned a B.S. in Materials Science Engineering from Alfred University, and received his M.S. and Ph.D., both from Tufts University, in Chemistry and Engineering Education respectively. Dr. Carberry was previously an employee of the Tufts’ Center for Engineering Education & Outreach.

visit author page

author page

Terry L. Alford Arizona State University

biography

Casey Jane Ankeny PhD Arizona State University

visit author page

Casey Ankeny is a lecturer in the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering at Arizona State University. Her research focuses on the effect of student-centered strategies on attitude, achievement, and persistence.

visit author page

biography

Milo Koretsky Oregon State University

visit author page

Milo Koretsky is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at Oregon State University. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from UC San Diego and his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, all in Chemical Engineering. He currently has research activity in areas related engineering education and is interested in integrating technology into effective educational practices and in promoting the use of higher-level cognitive skills in engineering problem solving. His research interests particularly focus on what prevents students from being able to integrate and extend the knowledge developed in specific courses in the core curriculum to the more complex, authentic problems and projects they face as professionals. Dr. Koretsky is one of the founding members of the Center for Lifelong STEM Education Research at OSU.

visit author page

biography

Bill Jay Brooks Oregon State University

visit author page

Bill Brooks is a postdoctoral scholar in the School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. His Ph.D used written explanations to concept questions to investigate technology mediated active learning in the undergraduate chemical engineering classroom. He current interests involve using technology to enhance educational practices in promoting conceptual understanding. He is the primary programmer of the AIChE Concept Warehouse and his current focus is on its continued development, specifically creating and integrating Interactive Virtual Labs.

visit author page

biography

Cindy Waters North Carolina A&T State University

visit author page

Cindy K. Waters is an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering at NCA&T State University. She received her B.S. and M.S from Virginia Tech in Materials Science and Engineering Department and a 2004 PhD in Mechanical Engineering, from NCA&T. Her research is in the development and characterization of novel syntactic foams and various porous metals via powder metallurgy and foam casting. She is also significantly involved in engineering education research in the areas of assessment studies of classroom material science pedagogical implementations; case studies in various engineering disciplines and; engineering faculty barriers to adopt evidence-based (or nontraditional) teaching methods . She serves as the College of Engineering liaison to ASEE and advises the Society of Women Engineers student chapter and leads the students in developing and implementing yearly outreach events for the K-8 female community. She is author of many peer-reviewed conference proceeding for the ASEE Annual Meetings and the FIE meetings.

visit author page

biography

Brady J. Gibbons Oregon State University

visit author page

Dr. Brady Gibbons is an Associate Professor of Materials Science in the School of Mechanical, Industrial, & Manufacturing Engineering at Oregon State University. His research specializes in structure-process-property relationships in multifunctional thin film materials. His group focuses on processing, novel instrumentation development, and integration science; new dielectric, superconducting, semiconducting, and pyroelectric materials for energy conversion and energy storage; ferroelectric and piezoelectric thin films for microelectromechanical systems; scanning probe and x-ray diffraction characterization methods; and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Specifically he is interested in developing novel integration science strategies to combine material functionalities that result in significantly enhanced, or even new, properties. Prior to arriving at OSU he spent eight years at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as a postdoctoral researcher and member of the technical staff. There, his research on 2nd generation superconducting wire led to an R&D 100 Award in 2004. He received his Ph. D. in Materials from the Pennsylvania State University in 1998. Dr. Gibbons is a 2012 NSF CAREER awardee, as well. That program is designed to develop new environmentally benign piezoelectric materials, which can be used for a variety of sensing and actuation applications including sonar, ultrasound, energy harvesting, and microelectromechanical systems.

visit author page

biography

Sean Maass

visit author page

Currently pursuing a Masters Degree in Materials Science and Engineering. Passionate about enhancing Engineering Education across the globe as well as continuing to learn more about Materials, Design, Manufacturing, Data Mining and Analysis, and Statistics.

visit author page

biography

Candace K. Chan Arizona State University

visit author page

Candace K. Chan is an assistant professor in Materials Science and Engineering in the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy at Arizona State University. She teaches introductory materials science to undergraduate engineering majors and is exploring the role of frequent, formative feedback and web-based teaching and learning on student engagement and understanding of materials concepts. Dr. Chan also teaches an advanced course on electrochemical energy conversion and storage and leads a group of undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral researchers focused on the design and characterization of novel materials for batteries and photoelectrochemical applications.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Characterizing and Addressing Student Learning Issues and Misconceptions (SLIMs) in Materials Science with Muddiest Point Reflections and Fast Formative FeedbackIt is generally acknowledged in engineering education research that, prior to instruction, studentsmay have faulty knowledge about how the world works, such as misconceptions. In order tocreate, develop, or restructure instructional materials and activities, instructors must be informedby that prior knowledge. In a sense, however, prior knowledge in a classroom setting alsoconsists of a variety of both Student Learning Issues and Misconceptions (SLIMs). These otherlearning issues can consist of different categories of impediments or barriers to learning. Onegeneral category could be called "gaps". One such type of gap is "knowledge gaps". Anothertype might be "gaps related to words and language" and could include vocabulary gaps ofmisunderstood, misused, incorrect or missing words and language gaps from faulty grammar orforeign language issues. Another gap type, "skill gaps", could include skills that are lacking,faulty, or misapplied in areas such as calculations, analysis, computation, and graph reading andinterpretation. These gaps in knowledge, words and skills fall under the general heading of thestudent learning issues part of SLIMs. Effective instructional materials and classroom practiceneed to be informed by and address such SLIMs, which might be acquired from broad formativeassessment of foundational knowledge of students who are learning new content. Suchassessments can span a broad range and include concept inventories, concept tests, homeworkassignments, tests, etc., but such instruments usually span longer time sequences of instructionthan a single class and may not provide timely and focused feedback to students. While class-by-class formative assessment could provide such information, such data collection and analysis iscumbersome. Presently, short formative assessments such as minute papers and muddiest pointshave been given with a card or sheet of paper to students near the end of a class. Compiling andanalyzing such data is tedious, but new web-enabled approaches can now provide quick and easyturnaround with rich and insightful data. One such approach will now be described.Initially, in a project called JTF (Just-in-Time-Teaching with Interactive Frequent FormativeFeedback), collecting Muddiest Point student response data was tedious, but has been transformedby a powerful tool, called the Concept Warehouse (CW), cw.edudiv.org. It is a web-enabledresource developed by Milo Koretsky at Oregon State University, that has automated Muddiest Pointdata gathering and analysis capabilities. Now, anonymous student Muddiest Point responses can becollected via the web to CW via smart phone, tablet or laptop computer. Then, CW can automaticallyoutput student response data in tabular quotation format, with a student Muddy Point intensity scaleof 0-5 for each response, along with a Word Cloud with word size proportional to word frequency.The word cloud allows instructors to instantly identify key words associated with student learningissues and misconceptions (SLIMs) from Muddiest Points feedback. Instructors can use the wordcloud and quotes with intensities, in order to strategize how to adjust instruction, create interventions,or create student learning resources such as activities, pencast tutorials, or Muddiest Point YouTubevideos. Research has shown that attending to learning issues as quickly as possible withimmediate feedback is most effective for motivation and learning. In this paper, a variety ofMuddiest-Point-generated SLIMs related to introductory materials science will be given asexamples along with strategies for addressing them. Additionally, assessment tools and results todetermine the effectiveness and impact of such cyber-enabled data collection and formativefeedback approaches for improving instructor teaching and student learning will be discussed.

Krause, S. J., & Baker, D. R., & Carberry, A. R., & Alford, T. L., & Ankeny, C. J., & Koretsky, M., & Brooks, B. J., & Waters, C., & Gibbons, B. J., & Maass, S., & Chan, C. K. (2014, June), Characterizing and Addressing Student Learning Issues and Misconceptions (SLIM) with Muddiest Point Reflections and Fast Formative Feedback Paper presented at 2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Indianapolis, Indiana. https://peer.asee.org/20164

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2014 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015