Asee peer logo

Co-creating a Teaching Module on the Impacts of COVID-19 on Various Transportation Systems and Stakeholders

Download Paper |

Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Reassessing Your Teaching Through Turmoil

Tagged Division

Civil Engineering

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

15

DOI

10.18260/1-2--36800

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/36800

Download Count

68

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Claudia Mara Dias Wilson New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology

visit author page

Dr. Claudia Mara Dias Wilson is an Associate Professor in civil engineering at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (New Mexico Tech). She earned her Bachelor’s, Master’s and Ph.D. degrees from the Florida State University. Although she specialized in earthquake mitigation and the development of control algorithms for semi-active dampers to reduce seismic vibrations on buildings, her research interests are broad and include topics in structural engineering, earthquake engineering, construction management, transportation engineering, and engineering education. She also advises the Student Chapters of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) and the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) at New Mexico Tech.

visit author page

biography

Janille A. Smith-Colin Southern Methodist University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-0297-4154

visit author page

Janille Smith-Colin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and a Fellow of Caruth Institute for Engineering Education at Southern Methodist University (SMU). She also leads the Transportation Projects and Organizations Research Group at SMU, whose mission is to advance sustainability and resilience goals through infrastructure systems research and education focused on developing methods and tools for engineering projects and organizations. Dr. Smith-Colin received her Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology, where she simultaneously earned a Certificate in Higher Education Teaching and Learning. Her engineering education research interests include the formation of engineering identity in underrepresented girls and women, social threats to this identity, and the development of professional skills and systems thinking amongst civil engineers. Dr. Smith-Colin was a 2019 American Society of Civil Engineering (ASCE) ExCEED Teaching Fellow.

visit author page

biography

Baris Salman Syracuse University

visit author page

Baris Salman is an Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Syracuse University. Dr. Salman’s research focuses on infrastructure asset management; particularly on improving decision making procedures for maintenance, repair, rehabilitation (MRR), and construction of physical infrastructure. Dr. Salman’s research group has been focusing on management aspects of a wide variety of infrastructure systems including pavements, bridges, airports, and buried infrastructure. Dr. Salman is also interested in improving undergraduate STEM education through incorporation of newer technologies into classroom activities. Dr. Salman holds a Ph.D. from University of Cincinnati and a B.Sc. in Civil Engineering from Middle East Technical University (Turkey).

visit author page

biography

Rodolfo Valdes-Vasquez Colorado State University

visit author page

Rodolfo Valdes-Vasquez is an Associate Professor in the Department of Construction Management at Colorado State University. He is committed to advancing research and teaching in the sustainability of infrastructure projects. He believes that educating the next generation of professionals will play a pivotal role in making sustainability a standard practice.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

COVID-19 has affected all aspects of life including how we travel. As faculty members responsible for teaching infrastructure courses across four universities, the authors collaborated on creating a teaching module addressing this important issue. The module focuses on the impacts of COVID-19 on different transportation systems from various stakeholder perspectives. The module is being implemented in two universities (n= 30) in fall 2020 and will be implemented again at two other schools in spring 2021. This paper presents the results obtained during the first implementation of the COVID-19 teaching module, during the fall semester of 2020, and addresses how instructors can enhance the module for future offerings, while highlighting any pedagogical issues that work and do not work, and how these can lead to improvements in engineering education. The module is composed of two pre-class activities, two in-class activities, a short lecture, and post-class activities. The pre-class activities consist of a concept map and a reflective writing assignment. As part of the reflective writing assignment, students are asked to review and reflect on at least one article and/or a video from a curated list that discusses the impacts of COVID-19 on transportation. Together, the pre-class concept map and reflective writing activities serve as a baseline to assess students’ pre-lecture knowledge. Specifically, students: a) identify impacts on stakeholder groups, b) describe the possible relationships between identified impacts, and c) discuss how these impacts may relate to their life experiences. During the lecture, instructors provide details about how transportation impacts can be evaluated from different stakeholder perspectives. In addition, students work in small groups to a) assess and describe how COVID-19 may impact individual travel when journeying from “Point A” to “Point B” via different transportation modes, and b) compare and contrast COVID-19 impacts under different scenarios. Scenarios discussed include a group of undergraduate students attending a conference, a mother traveling with a toddler and a baby to visit family, and a couple in their 60s traveling to their vacation home. Because the module will be taught at different institutions, instructors should choose destinations and scenarios applicable to their geographical context that will lead to the selection of various transportation modes. Two post-class activities are included as part of the teaching module. In the first, students revise their individual concept maps; and in the second, students complete an impact matrix where they are asked to classify impacts in categories - intended vs. unintended and beneficial vs. adverse. The post-class data allows for the measurement of knowledge gained by students and highlights misconceptions held about how COVID-19 impacts transportation systems and users. This paper offers contributions to our engineering community as it is one of the few studies focusing on lessons learned from the COVID-19 experience, while providing recommendations for how engineering courses can be improved accordingly.

Wilson, C. M. D., & Smith-Colin, J. A., & Salman, B., & Valdes-Vasquez, R. (2021, July), Co-creating a Teaching Module on the Impacts of COVID-19 on Various Transportation Systems and Stakeholders Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. 10.18260/1-2--36800

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2021 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015