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Collaborative Autoethnographic Study of a Large-Scale Flipped Classroom Implementation with Multiple Instructors

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

NEE 2 - Strategies to Improve Teaching Effectiveness

Tagged Division

New Engineering Educators

Page Count

12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32516

Download Count

33

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Paper Authors

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Robyn Paul University of Calgary Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-5619-5754

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Robyn Paul PhD student at the Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary where she also works as the Program Evaluation and Planning Specialist. She is the team lead for the faculty on all matters related engineering education including teaching and learning, curriculum development, Capstone design and engineering accreditation. Robyn just completed master’s degree in engineering education where she is looking at the impact of engineering leadership development on career success.

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Mohammad Moshirpour University of Calgary

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Dr. Mohammad Moshirpour is an instructor of Software Engineering at the Schulich School of Engineer, University of Calgary. His research interests are the area of software architecture, software requirements engineering, design, implementation and analysis of multi-agent systems, intelligent data analytics, data mining and machine learning, and Software engineering and computer science education. He is a senior member of IEEE, and is the IEEE Chair of the Computer Chapter of the Southern Alberta Section.

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Emily Ann Marasco University of Calgary

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Dr. Emily Marasco is a sessional instructor at the University of Calgary. Her education research focuses on creativity in electrical and computer engineering. Dr. Marasco is also an education specialist with EZ Robot Inc. and co-hosts The Robot Program, an educational webseries for teaching robotics through technology to thousands of students, educators, and hobbyists around the globe. Dr. Marasco speaks regularly at conferences and in the community on topics from technical work to technological impact. She has won ASTech and 3-Minute Thesis awards for her work in science communication and outreach, and received the 2016 CEMF Claudette MacKay-Lassonde Graduate Award for her work relating to the promotion of women in engineering. In 2018, Dr. Marasco received the prestigious ASTech Outstanding Leaders of Tomorrow award.

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Sepideh Afkhami Goli University of Calgary

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Ehsan Mohammadi University of Calgary

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Fatemeh Sharifi University of Calgary

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Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

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Abstract

The flipped classroom model is being used in many engineering courses. By guiding students to study course material online or outside of scheduled class time, instructors can focus on hands-on assignments and projects during their interactions with students. The flipped classroom model implements online learning as an effective technique to engage students and maximize learning. However, developing online content is time-consuming and can be challenging. Moreover, the course can be very dependent on previously developed material and can be challenging to adapt for instructors who are new to the course. The challenges to adapt to the new course may also include differences in teaching styles of instructors which may not necessarily be compatible with the existing design of the course.

These challenges intensified for large-scale courses with enrollment numbers in the hundreds as several instructors are required each semester. The flipped delivery requires careful collaboration and coordination amongst instructors. Although the results may be very fruitful, this may need a considerable amount of discipline and planning. This paper aims to understand the experience of four instructors who co-taught sections of a large first-year course using flipped course delivery.

A collaborative autoethnographic study is used to understand the effective strategies and challenges encountered from the instructors. Six themes emerged from the data on the instructors’ experiences of a large-scale flipped classroom implementation with multiple instructors. These six themes include: building a community of teaching; consistency across sections, while still allowing for flexibility; in-person time with students needs to complement videos; setting clear student expectations; pride of what was accomplished; and collaboration brings value but can be challenging.

Overall, the results from this qualitative collaborative ethnography provide insight into the experience of four instructors team teaching using a flipped classroom model. These findings can be useful to others who are looking at implementing flipped classrooms when there are multiple sections. Future research can further look into other perspectives, including bringing in student perspective to the instructor experience.

Paul, R., & Moshirpour, M., & Marasco, E. A., & Afkhami Goli, S., & Mohammadi, E., & Sharifi, F. (2019, June), Collaborative Autoethnographic Study of a Large-Scale Flipped Classroom Implementation with Multiple Instructors Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/32516

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