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Community Designers: A Pilot Virtual Community Codesign Symposium

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Community Engagement Division Technical Session 2

Tagged Division

Community Engagement Division

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

32

DOI

10.18260/1-2--36816

Permanent URL

https://strategy.asee.org/36816

Download Count

27

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Paper Authors

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Pamela Cristina Silva Diaz PamLab Design and Engineering

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Pamela Silva Díaz is a mechanical engineer with experience in appropriate technology, participatory design and humanitarian innovation. She completed her bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2012 and obtained her Master of Science in the same field at the University of Michigan in 2014. Through her business, PamLab Design and Engineering, she blends strategic design facilitation with mechanical engineering services to co-create innovative solutions for community challenges.

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Maggie Favretti Design Ed 4 Resilience

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Maggie Favretti is a lifelong learner, and authentic engagement educator. Throughout her career teaching high schoolers and teachers, college students and professors, and community adult leaders, Maggie converges disciplines and aligns sectors toward shared efficacy and problem solving. Maggie's current work recenters the role of designer (design thinking) in youth, educators and community, and focuses on disaster recovery, youth empowerment, and climate justice.

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Nathalia Ospina Uribe earned her B.S. degree in Architecture from the Univ. La Gran Colombia (UGC) (2013). Finish her M.E. degree in Civil Engineering and Construction Project Management at the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus (UPRM) in (2019). Prior to starting her M.E., Ospina worked in different construction sites and projects serving as a Technical and Contractor Architect. Ospina has diverse interests in the research area of Community Resilience; Appropriated Technology; Climate Change; and Participatory Engineering. She co-developed a workshop curriculum to measured and prepared vulnerable communities to improve their level of resilience for catastrophic events.

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Christopher Papadopoulos University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez

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Christopher Papadopoulos is Professor in the Department of Engineering Sciences and Materials at the University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus (UPRM). He earned B.S. degrees in Civil Engineering and Mathematics from Carnegie Mellon University (1993) and a Ph.D. in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics at Cornell University (1999). Prior to UPRM, Papadopoulos served on the faculty in the Department of Civil engineering and Mechanics at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

Papadopoulos has diverse research and teaching interests in structural mechanics and bioconstruction (with emphasis in bamboo); appropriate technology; engineering ethics; and mechanics education. He has served as PI of several NSF-sponsored research projects and is co-author of Lying by Approximation: The Truth about Finite Element Analysis. He is active in the Mechanics Division.

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Marcel Castro-Sitiriche University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-7650-4112

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Marcel J. Castro-Sitiriche is a professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Puerto Rico in the Mayagüez Campus (Recinto Universitario de Mayagüez). His research efforts contain academic, educational and service activities. Some of the research areas of interest include appropriate technology, rural power, power electronics, decentralized energy, and renewable energy systems. He is the co-coordinator of the Social, Ethical, and Global Issues in Engineering program at the College of Engineering in the University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez. He is chair of the IEEE Engineering Education Western Puerto Rico chapter, and member of the International Network on Appropriate Technology.

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Luisa Rosario Seijo-Maldonado

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Marian Irizarry University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez

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Javier Moscoso University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus

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Gabriela Alexandra Otero-Andino

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Kevin O'neil Crespo Pagan

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Laura Sofia Garcia Canto

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Grace Amato Connecticut College

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Fernando Antonio Cuevas University of Puerto Rico

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My name is Fernando A. Cuevas Quintana, I am 24 years old. I have a bachelor's degree in social work from the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus with a lower concentration in human rights. I am certified in autism. I am currently pursuing my master's degree in clinical social work at the Inter-American University, Metro Campus, while working with the University of Puerto Rico on the UPR Estudia Contigo.

I am a member of the Corcovada community in Añasco. I am passionate about visions directed towards human rights and being active in matters of social importance. I consider myself a militant in spaces that ensure collective well-being and cooperative work.

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Dulce M. del Rio-Pineda Mujeres de Islas, Inc.

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Reiner F. Simshauser-Arroyo University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez

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Abstract

Community Designers: A Pilot Virtual Community Co-Design Symposium

Among the challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic is how to develop innovative strategies to address repeating and overlapping catastrophic events, and how to achieve this by engaging communities in ways that not only authentically invites their participation but empowers them to drive change. This paper addresses how to adapt and manage convergent cooperative “co-design” activities in a virtual setting that uses design thinking to bring together experts from communities, and university students and faculty from engineering and sociology. The authors represent a team that developed and executed an online symposium entitled “Co-Designing,” held from July 20 - August 6, 2020. The Symposium brought together diverse and multi-generational teams of 2-6 persons, totalling 42 participants from 11 local communities, including 28 women and 9 children under the age of 18 (with parental consent). The Symposium also included a staff of about a dozen leaders, mentors, and facilitators, including a mixture of independent scholars, faculty, and students. To facilitate virtual community-designer participation, we developed a cooperative mentoring framework and hi-tech/lo-tech interface. The Symposium engaged participants in learning the concepts of Co-Design Thinking, through the application of Appropriate Technology and Participatory Action Research methodology. Each community team chose a theme of disaster recovery - contact tracing, handwashing, and off-grid energy - and developed prototype solutions meaningful to their community. Student mentors learned to facilitate community co-design, replicable in future community engagement applications of engineering and convergent disciplines. Community teams learned a new process that validates their knowledge and flexes their efficacy to drive change from vision, to problem solving, to implementation project management. Community feedback indicated that participants felt empowered to use the co-design process in the future, and to expand their new innovation-implementation ecosystem to increase resilience.

Silva Diaz, P. C., & Favretti, M., & Ospina Uribe, N., & Papadopoulos, C., & Castro-Sitiriche, M., & Seijo-Maldonado, L. R., & Irizarry, M., & Moscoso, J., & Otero-Andino, G. A., & Crespo Pagan, K. O., & Garcia Canto, L. S., & Amato, G., & Cuevas, F. A., & del Rio-Pineda, D. M., & Simshauser-Arroyo, R. F. (2021, July), Community Designers: A Pilot Virtual Community Codesign Symposium Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. 10.18260/1-2--36816

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2021 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015