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Comparison Of International Learning Outcomes And Development Of Engineering Curricula

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Conference

2009 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Austin, Texas

Publication Date

June 14, 2009

Start Date

June 14, 2009

End Date

June 17, 2009

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Global Engineering Education: Developments, Implementations

Tagged Division

International

Page Count

22

Page Numbers

14.346.1 - 14.346.22

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/5212

Download Count

128

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Paper Authors

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Ashraf Alkhairy Alfaisal University

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Ashraf Alkhairy, PhD is the Founding Dean of Engineering at Alfaisal University. He received the Bachelor's, Master's and PhD degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from MIT, where he worked as a research scientist. He has served on the faculty of King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, and was a visiting scientist at the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT and the Schlumberger Carbonate Research Center.

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Leland Blank Texas A&M University

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Leland Blank, PhD, PE is currently Visiting Professor at Texas A&M University at Qatar. He has held engineering faculty and administrative positions at the American University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, Texas A&M University, and the University of Texas - El Paso. He received the ASEE/IIE 2008 Wellington Award for outstanding contributions in the filed of engineering economy. He is past president of the Institute of Industrial Engineers and a Fellow of the Institute.

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Duane Boning MIT

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Duane Boning, PhD is Professor and Associate Head of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, and is affiliated with the MIT Microsystems Technology Laboratories. He is Editor in Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Semiconductor Manufacturing and his research interests include the modeling and control of variation in IC and MEMS processes, devices, and circuits.

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David Cardwell University of Cambridge

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David Cardwell, PhD, FInstP, CPhys, FIET, CEng is Professor of Superconducting Engineering in the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge. He received his MA degree from Cambridge University and PhD from Warwick University. His research interests are in high temperature superconductivity and its applications, and processing and magnetic properties of bulk superconductors.

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W Craig Carter MIT

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W. Craig Carter, PhD is a Lord Foundation Professor of Materials Science at MIT. He has published papers on many different aspects of theory and computation of materials properties, and is the author of a widely-used graduate textbook. He has received research and teaching awards. Last year he became a MacVicar fellow at MIT to recognize his contributions to education and also received the MIT Bose award for excellence in engineering teaching.

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Nick Collings University of Cambridge

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Nick Collings, PhD is Professor at the Cambridge University Engineering Department in the Acoustics, Fluid Mechanics, Turbomachinery and Thermodynamics Division. He is also a member of Robinson College. His areas of interest are internal combustion engine and the sentient vehicle.

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Allan Hayhurst University of Cambridge

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Allan Hayhurst, PhD is Emeritus Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Cambridge University and an Honorary Professor at Krakow Technical University. He received all his degree from the University of Cambridge and is a Fellow of Queen’s College and Chairman of the British Section of the Combustion Institute. His research interests include heat and mass transfer and chemical kinetics.

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William Milne

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Bill Milne, PhD, FREng is Head of Electrical Engineering at Cambridge University and Head of the Electronic Devices and Materials Group. He obtained his BSc from St Andrews University in Scotland in 1970 and then went on to read for a PhD in Electronic Materials at Imperial College London. He was awarded his PhD and DIC in 1973 and in 2003, a D.Eng (Honoris Causa) from University of Waterloo, Canada. He has published/presented ~ 600 papers, of which ~ 120 were invited.

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Peter Robinson University of Cambridge

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Peter Robinson, PhD is Professor of Computer Technology in the Computer Laboratory at the University of Cambridge, where he leads the Rainbow Group working on computer graphics and interaction. He is a Fellow of Gonville & Caius College where he previously studied for a first degree in Mathematics and a PhD in Computer Science under Neil Wiseman. He is a Chartered Engineer and a Fellow of the British Computer Society.

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Warren Seering MIT

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Warren Seering, PhD is Weber-Shaugness Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Professor of Engineering Systems at MIT. His prior positions at MIT have included Division Head of the Design and Systems Division of Mechanical Engineering, Co-Director of the Nissan Cambridge Basic Research Laboratory, and Co-Director of the MIT Center for Innovation in Product Development. He has won several teaching awards and is a Fellow of ASME.

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Kenneth Smith MIT

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Kenneth Smith, ScD is Gilliland Professor of Chemical Engineering at MIT. His prior positions at MIT include Acting Head of Department of Chemical Engineering, Associate Provost, VP for Research, and Director of the Whitaker College of Health Sciences and Technology. He is an Overseas Fellow of Churchill College of the University of Cambridge and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1983.

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Sallie Sheppard Texas A&M University

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Sallie Sheppard, PhD is Professor Emeritus of Computer Science at Texas A&M University. She was TAMU’s Associate Provost for Undergraduate Programs and Interim Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs. She received the Texas A&M University Former Students’ Award for Outstanding Teaching and for Outstanding Administration. She later joined the administration of the American University of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates.

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Bill Stronge University of Cambridge

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Bill Stronge, PhD is Emeritus Professor of Applied Mechanics at Cambridge University and Adjunct Professor at University of California-Davis. He is Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and Fellow of American Academy of
Mechanics. He has been a principal investigator for the British Council, Academic
Links with China Scheme. He has a PhD from Stanford University and was head of the Structural Dynamics Division at the US Naval Weapons Center.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Comparison of International Learning Outcomes and Development of Engineering Curricula

Abstract

Various national and regional engineering accreditation bodies have developed sets of learning or program outcomes that serve as the foundation for the evaluation of curriculum quality. Some of the outcome structures are very broadly defined, leaving the details of curriculum design and the justification to the university and the accreditation evaluators. Other accreditation bodies define outcomes more thoroughly in topic and depth, with accreditation hinging on the general fit of the curriculum to these specifications.

Most of these outcome structures have been developed and used as accreditation standards predominantly over the last decade. During this time, existing curricula are usually altered and upgraded (that is, ‘retrofitted’) to meet the outcomes requirements. However, new degree programs and new engineering colleges have the opportunity to use the relevant outcomes as design specifications. Such a design ensures quality, prepares the college for future accreditation evaluation, and can be tailored to meet the needs of students and prospective employers.

This paper compares the outcomes structure and contents of several accreditation bodies, including the Engineering Council of the UK (ECUK), EUR-ACE of the EU, and ABET of the USA. Similarities and differences between the outcomes of the bodies will be highlighted. The use of these accrediting standards as the basis of design specifications for engineering degrees at the Alfaisal University in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia will be presented. The designs for integrated BS, MS and PhD curricula were developed over a two-year period, based on the defined learning outcomes, by a committee comprised of the Founding Dean of Engineering and faculty from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the University of Cambridge and independent reviewers. Example BS and MS curricula and their fit to the outcome specifications are described.

Learning Outcomes

The development of learning outcomes by accrediting and professional education organizations has taken shape and been refined during the last decade for several reasons. Primary drivers are the recognition and adoption of the continuous improvement movement in higher education and the intent of accreditation organizations to place the burden of proof for education quality on the university. The latter aspect has led to the replacement of detailed degree program content imperatives with learning (or program) outcomes that allow the university faculty to develop and demonstrate how to best educate their students. The progression of learning outcomes development by accrediting agencies is evidenced by the publication and use of expected outcomes by organizations such as the Engineering Council of the United Kingdom (ECUK)8, the European Federation of National Engineering Associations (EUR-ACE) of the European Union10, and ABET, Inc. of the United States1, 2.

Alkhairy, A., & Blank, L., & Boning, D., & Cardwell, D., & Carter, W. C., & Collings, N., & Hayhurst, A., & Milne, W., & Robinson, P., & Seering, W., & Smith, K., & Sheppard, S., & Stronge, B. (2009, June), Comparison Of International Learning Outcomes And Development Of Engineering Curricula Paper presented at 2009 Annual Conference & Exposition, Austin, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/5212

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2009 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015