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Computer Aided Engineering Introduction In A Multi Disciplinary Engineering Program

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Instrumentation and Laboratory Systems

Tagged Division

Computers in Education

Page Count

7

Page Numbers

11.340.1 - 11.340.7

DOI

10.18260/1-2--1053

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1053

Download Count

117

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Paper Authors

biography

John Phillips University of Guelph

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John Phillips, B.Sc. Eng.
Design Engineer
School of Engineering
University of Guelph

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biography

Michele Oliver University of Guelph

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Dr. Michele Oliver, Ph.D., P Eng.
Assistant Professor
School of Engineering
University of Guelph

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biography

Bill Van Heyst University of Guelph

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Dr. Bill Van Heyst, Ph.D., P.Eng.
Assistant Professor
School of Engineering
University of Guelph

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Douglas Joy University of Guelph

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Dr. Douglas M. Joy, Ph.D., P.Eng.
Associate Professor
School of Engineering
University of Guelph

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Warren Stiver University of Guelph

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Dr. Warren Stiver, Ph.D., P.Eng.
Associate Professor & NSERC Chair in Environmental Design Engineering
School of Engineering
University of Guelph
wstiver@uoguelph.ca

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Computer-Aided-Engineering: Introduction in a Multi-disciplinary Engineering Program

Introduction

Computer-aided engineering (CAE) and computer-aided design (CAD) are taking an increasing role for the practicing engineer in both design and analysis context. For the practicing engineer, it provides an opportunity to explore creative ideas without the initial expense of prototypes and/or pilot facilities. The importance of CAE in engineering education is well established and many engineering programs now include some type of formal education utilizing solid modelling software packages1,2,3. Many studies have shown that the use of CAE software enhances the learning of students at all levels from first year4,5,6 to fourth year7,8. The CAD/CAE software packages themselves tend to be broad based, offer extensive tools for the experienced practitioner and hence they may not be intuitive to the novice user.

CAE is not a trivial domain. It is easy to generate results that are incorrect and dangerous9. Therefore, it is essential to know what is going on within a software program and recognize the software’s limitations10. Unfortunately, it is easy for a student or the practitioner to generate impressive pictures with CAE software which display completely erroneous results. Engineering education must develop strategies to ensure that our graduates recognize the power of CAE while respecting the risks and responsibilities associated with its use.

The University of Guelph offers fully accredited engineering programs in Biological, Systems and Computing, Environmental, and Water Resources. Each program at Guelph is multidisciplinary blend of traditional engineering disciplines. Design is recognized as the essence of engineering and has been delivered at the School through a core sequence of design courses since the early 1970s11. These core design courses offer all of our students the experience of working in multi-disciplinary teams. The introduction of CAD/CAE tools into the curriculum began in Fall 2000 with a single course and has evolved to be offered in three second year courses. This paper presents the current approach, which has largely been in practice for the past 2 or 3 years. The paper then discusses some of the key attributes that are believed to be important for success and assesses the level of intelligent usage by students in their fourth year capstone design projects.

CAD/CAE Delivery in Second Year

The participating second year courses are Engineering & Design II and Material Science (fall offerings), and Fluid Mechanics (winter offering). All of these courses are taken by all engineering students at Guelph. Solid modelling is introduced in Engineering and Design II. The basics of finite element modelling related to solid mechanics problems are introduced in Material Science. Computational fluid dynamics is introduced in Fluid Mechanics.

Engineering & Design II is the core course supporting CAE. The students, in teams of approximately 10, start in the machine shop dissecting a product. Over the years, the products have ranged from refrigerators, to computers, to the components of a 1986 Honda Prelude. This

Phillips, J., & Oliver, M., & Van Heyst, B., & Joy, D., & Stiver, W. (2006, June), Computer Aided Engineering Introduction In A Multi Disciplinary Engineering Program Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. 10.18260/1-2--1053

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